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Hi all,

We are in the process of closing a new house. We had the builder add rough-in lighting for under the kitchen cabinets. This basically consists of one switch together with three runs of wire to attach a total of three lights under the cabinets (all controlled by that switch). I've found lots of florescent lights that I could use by hardwiring them in. But I have not found any LED products that allow me to hardwire. They all require an electrical outlet (and often have a toggle switch on the power cord). I really don't want to install three outlets under the cabinets to plug these lights in -- I'd much rather be able to hardwire them directly. I know that LED lights need a transformer, but I still don't see why that transformer can't be built into the fixture itself (or even into the bulbs). Can anyone recommend an LED product of the kind I would like to buy?
 

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Hi all,

We are in the process of closing a new house. We had the builder add rough-in lighting for under the kitchen cabinets. This basically consists of one switch together with three runs of wire to attach a total of three lights under the cabinets (all controlled by that switch). I've found lots of florescent lights that I could use by hardwiring them in. But I have not found any LED products that allow me to hardwire. They all require an electrical outlet (and often have a toggle switch on the power cord). I really don't want to install three outlets under the cabinets to plug these lights in -- I'd much rather be able to hardwire them directly. I know that LED lights need a transformer, but I still don't see why that transformer can't be built into the fixture itself (or even into the bulbs). Can anyone recommend an LED product of the kind I would like to buy?
Go to a lighting store.
 

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I usually sell LED tape lights that have a remote driver. I recently did a job where I installed line voltage lights. I believe my distributor had WAC or Juno. I went with WAC. I don't know what is offered at a consumer level but now at least you have a couple of brand names to reference
 

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i hard wired, kinda, my led strip lights. i put outlets inside that cabinets. works great.

for you, just cut off the plug and nut the wires together.
 

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If you are running them all off of one transformer and looping them together, what is an approved wire I can run in the wall. Obviously zip cord is not approved. It will be low voltage.
 

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it is just like it would be in a wall, as in, it is in the wall. except there is a cabinet over it, with a hole cut and a cover.



please explain why.
The unit with the cord and plug attached is manufactured and approved as an assembly. The cord wire is a rated portable cord and not made for a permanent installation. If you were to look closely at the cord, you should see some labeling on it. Look up that cord classification in your code book to see what it is approved for.

Was it a polarized plug that you cut off?
 

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If you are running them all off of one transformer and looping them together, what is an approved wire I can run in the wall. Obviously zip cord is not approved. It will be low voltage.
Romex will work. I did a kitchen last year, but before I was even hired the owner went and bought all of her own undercabinet lights without consulting an electrician. They were all low voltage WAC LED lights with a plug-in jack for power. I used Romex in the walls and WAC makes a transition coupling to go from Romex to low voltage wire. I had to order the WAC cords made for these lights and cut one end off to connect to the Romex. I mounted the transition under each cabinet behind the undercabinet lights. I brought all of the Romexes together in a junction box mounted in the cabinet above the fridge. I put a switched outlet there also for the transformer.

The WAC transition couplings were nothing more than a tiny junction box with a terminal block inside. The terminal blocks were on the delicate side and I wound up breaking one. I used wirenuts on that one inside of the transition.
 

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The unit with the cord and plug attached is manufactured and approved as an assembly. The cord wire is a rated portable cord and not made for a permanent installation. If you were to look closely at the cord, you should see some labeling on it. Look up that cord classification in your code book to see what it is approved for.



Was it a polarized plug that you cut off?
if done in a junction box, and not buried. i don't see a problem with it, but thats just me.

i didn't do mine that way. my walls were gutted. i ran romex in the wall to box's. insulation, drywall, cabinets, outlets and covers.
 

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I used the ones that Mrelectriciantv put links up for. I have one on either side of my kitchen sank. I ran 14/2 from one to the other and the splice was made inside the unit
 
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