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A friend helped hang something and used my drill and a mason bit. He said a Hammer Drill would have been easier.

I have never heard of these. Even when I lived in a cbs house and had trouble hanging things on an outside wall. Now a girlfriend here in Fla said they have two.

Maybe I need one. Are these common tools for homeowners?
 

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Very common and I use mine almost exclusively. Mine is a Makita but a search was showing only refurbished like mine. There are other brands. Mine came as a kit with a drill (has a regular chuck) and a driver which uses the quick connect. It isn't a heavy duty impact unit but sure helps with the masonry drill bits.

Note, I also picked up a chuck that uses the quick connect so I can use all drill bits.

Bud
 
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I have one, new in the box, that I haven't had a chance to use yet. My dad was trying to drill into concrete a few years ago using a regular drill with a masonry bit. He was at it for about an hour and barely made any progress. If I remember correctly he was in the process of having his basement waterproofed and they were drilling in the floor in preparation to cutting a channel. A young woman, part of the waterproofing crew, came in with a hammer drill, and drilled the hole he had been trying to do in about 10 seconds. As they say, the right tool for the right job.
 

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If you have money that you want to spend on a new tool, a hammer drill is as good an investment as anything, but not a feature that you would use a lot. I referred to is as a "feature" because for most homeowner projects a combination drill like Bud mentioned, and what I have, has a selector for regular drilling or hammer drilling. And, as I mentioned, this feature handles most homeowner projects. For heavier applications, you will find also find SDS drills, which instead of a standard three drill chuck have a specific chuck that accepts specific bits, and they're great, I use one from work a few times a year, but a lot heavier duty and not a very practical investment for an average homeowner.
 

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Property Mgt/Maint
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Does a typical home owner need a hammer drill? Unless you can foresee a need to drill several holes in concrete, brick or other masonry, then probably not. But some smaller hammer drills have dual function, reg drill/hammer drill modes that might be a decent option. At least then you use the tool as regular drill, and have a hammer if the need should arise.
 

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A hammer drill is not very common and used only when drilling in to concrete or concrete block.

What is common is a impact driver which is a lighter version of a hammer drill and is normally included in a set.
As stated previously by someone, a hammer drill is pretty common. Serves as a standard drill......until the hammer function is needed.....which is when drilling through brick or concrete. To clarify for all, a drill/driver goes in a circular direction. A hammer drill does the same....but when the hammer function is turned on it also gives the bit a whack on the ack end like a hammer....while an impact driver also does the circle deal....but when it encounters resistance it whacks the drill bit.....but not from the back: instead in a circular motion in the direction that it is going. Hammer drill can work just like a regular drill....but regular drill doesn’t have the optional hammer function.
 

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Ayuh,...... Back when I ditched milwaukee, 'n went to Makita cordless, I grabbed a drill that included the hammer drill function,.....

If yer workin' on/ near masonry, it's a Must have tool,.....

With a hammer drill in one hand, 'n an impact driver in the another, it's amazin' how many tap-cons you can sink,....
 

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On the left a hammer drill that will drill regular holes with regular bits. Will drill concrete but nothing like it's big brother.



On the right a rotary hammer that uses special bits that does many things for contractors, not usually needed by a home owner.


 

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For as often as the average homeowner is going to use one, the $20 corded 1/2" max hammer drill from Harbor Freight is all you need.


I personally do not own and would not buy a cordless hammer drill; you need the power of a corded model.
 
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Remodel and New Build GC
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If you do any construction/remodeling, I love my Bosch Bulldog.

Three functions....drilling,,,hammer / impact drilling...or just hammer. Have an adapter also that chucks regular bit into its SDS chuck,

Many uses....any and all concrete work its invaluable.....then with a chizel or spade bit, I use it to demo, dig, take up tile, chip away concrete/rock...even have a "bit" for pounding in ground rod.
 

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I would still consider it a good tool for a homeowner.
Often good deals on cordless Makita kits.

With a impact driver and a hammer drill. The drill works as a regular drill and has a switch for hammer mode.
Both of these tools work good and will last.
 

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Does a typical home owner need a hammer drill? Unless you can foresee a need to drill several holes in concrete, brick or other masonry, then probably not. But some smaller hammer drills have dual function, reg drill/hammer drill modes that might be a decent option. At least then you use the tool as regular drill, and have a hammer if the need should arise.
First off I agree 100%. I have a two speed corded milwaukee drill/hammer drill I bought 35ish years ago. Still works very well along with the other 4-5 drills I have.
With all this said it's better to borrow your neighbors hammer drill on rare occasion than to buy one. :wink2:
 

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If you are getting a new drill, might as well get one with hammer function. I have the cordless Makita LXT and it works great and easily switches from driver to normal drill to hammer drill with a simple twist of the collar. Other mfgs work similar.
 

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If you're not going to use it often, hammer function just makes your drill big and heavy. Some types of concrete are impossible with a regular masonry bit. But that is rare. You can usually make a hole with a masonry bit, but it just grinds its way in. It doesn't "drill". So it walks around and the holes are too big. It doesn't work for Tapcons. For a quick repair to a downspout strap, you can use a masonry bit and a couple of plastic anchors. That's what I usually do. I use Bosch masonry bits that fit in my impact driver. It keeps life simple. If you are finishing your basement and there is concrete in every direction, maybe you want the hammer drill.

I imagine a corded hammer drill would complement an impact driver well. The hammer drill would have more power and RPMs, it would drill concrete all day, and you could use it for wood bits that don't have hex shafts. But the impact driver is the quick, convenient one that you carry in your tool bag and use all the time.
 

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Hammer drills are good for concrete and some types of masonry. They can also blow out large chunks of material on the front or back sides.

For cured concrete a concrete drill bit and a hammer drill are a good choice but for softer material such as hollow cinder block it is much safer to use only the drill bit to bore the hole without the hammer action activated.

Whenever possible it is a good idea to do test holes on scrap material or where there will not be a problem if things go sideways.

With hard materials cobalt drills (Bosch with masonry drill bit) or tungsten carbide teeth hole saws (Hole Pro Mega TCT) will cut much faster and last a great deal longer.
 
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