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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have some bad grout in my kitchen that I replaced and some bad grout in my bathroom that I need to replace. But after replacing the grout in the kitchen I have a few questions:

1. Should I be using caulk or grout here?
2. Is this siliconized caulk appropriate (see picture below of caulk I'm using) for a shower stall or even behind a sink that will get wet? Or is there better caulk/grout? The label says to “do not use in areas with constant water exposure” which seems odd since the front label says “use around tubs and sinks” where there is lots of water exposure. I was reading that epoxy caulk is better than silicone caulk for water sealing (I realize that’s a biased source).
3. Is it okay to get the caulk you just put down extra wet with water before it cures? The label says to use soap and water clean excess caulk before it cures, but it seems that when I tried this, it sort of distorted the new caulk I just put down.
4. Finally, I also put pictures of the shower stalls I need to redo. Is this caulk appropriate here? If not, what should I use? It seems a bit different as some of the angles are different.

Thanks for all the help!

Caulk:
Hand Fluid Paint Finger Drink


Shower Stall:
Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor Shade


bathroom cracks:


Rectangle Wood Grey Wall Material property



Wood Gas Shelving Cylinder Rectangle
 

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Sanded grout is used for larger grout spaces. Non sanded grout is what I used in my kitchen, then I sealed it once cured. Caulk in the field of tile is a stop gap and will not last. To much water when you clean the tile.

I have always been afraid of using caulk in a tube, Do not know how old it is and if it has been stored properly.
 

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The color matched caulk in a tube is supposed to be used at the wall-floor joint, where 2 planes meet. It’s not meant for general use. You should use regular dry-mix grout for setting tiles and replacingg bad grout. When they talk about cleaning with soap & water … read carefully … that’s for cleaning excess caulk off tools, where it has oozed out on top of the tiles, etc. you need to let the caulk cure overnight before cleaning the joints.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The directions are not clear at all about the cleaning: “Completely fill joints with caulk. Smooth caulk. Clean off excess caulk with soap and water before it cures”

also, here’s a source I was using for deciding on caulk vs grout. It seemed to say grout is more for like floor tiling to hold tiles in place.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is where in the kitchen where I applied the new caulk. The lighter stuff is new. Is this an appropriate spot. Or will the water spill off just cause deterioration within several months?

Automotive tire Hood Automotive lighting Grille Motor vehicle


Automotive tire Wood Automotive exterior Plumbing fixture Line
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well that’s a relief lol. What about that shower stall pic? That’s another 90 degree angle but between wall and shower floor (which is a plastic like material). And should I be using real grout where those cracks are in the shower niches?
 
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