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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My home is 10 years old and I have an underground electrical service, the service comes out of the ground and into a Millbanks meter can and then a short distance through plastic conduit to the main breaker box. When I first installed the main breaker box I bonded the neutral and ground in the breaker box which I assumed was the main service disconnect, in the meter can I landed the ground wire from the ground rods on the grounding bus bar inside the meter can but later I realized that this configuration also bonds the neutral and the ground by default as that is the way the meter can was manufactured, so I changed the ground wires in the meter can and made them simply pass through, but now there is no ground wire attached to the meter can.

So my question is should I bond the ground and neural in the meter can or the breaker box? The meter can is not by definition a service disconnect (I think) but if I bond the neutral and ground in the main service disconnect (breaker box) I don't have a ground wire attached in the meter can. I am so confused. I doubt that my home would ever be inspected and actually the electrical was never ever inspected but I just want to make sure that it is right in my mind. Thanks
 

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I would check with your power company to see if they even allow the ground in the meter socket. Here the ground would be bonded in the service panel.
 

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to the best of my knowledge no grounding in meter cab here on residential
 

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none of the POCO's in may area allow a GEC to even pass through the meter base let alone be bonded in the meter base.

grounds and neutral are only bonded at the point of first disconnect, only.

Unless you have an isolated neutral terminal in the meter base, the meter base is connected to the GEC via the bond in the main panel.
 

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In a typical residential service the neutral upstream of the main panel is the ground also. So there are four conductors including ground downstream of the main disconnect and three conductors upstream. (In an overhead service drop the same wire, usually bare, is neutral, ground, and support, and is tied to an overhead ground wire that goes from pole to pole where the latter wire is tied to ground wires going down various poles to ground rods and also to the transformer secondary center tap.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank You

Thanks everyone for your comments.

So does anyone have any thoughts on why a ground wire can not be landed inside the meter can? To me it seems like it should be but I must be missing something. I am certain though that when I built the house I did have the green ground wire landed in the meter can and the subcontractor for ComEd (power co) attached the wires without a problem and ten days later they installed the meter.
 

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So does anyone have any thoughts on why a ground wire can not be landed inside the meter can?
cuz the POCO said so and if you don't do what they say, they don't hook up your power.:eek:


there is no need for and EGC or the GEC to be in that meter base. The neutral is bonded directly to both the EGC and GEC in the service disconnect.

one reason I can think of is, you cannot run parallel grounds and that is what you are doing between the meter and the service disconnect. and when you are allowed to run paralleled conductors, there are strict requirements as to size and length. when ever you paralleled conductors, the wire size and length of the paralleled conductors must be equal.
 

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Reason#2: the power company seals the meter socket,

Making it inaccessable for testing terminations.

Go to your power company web site.They'll have

their service entrance rules on line to reference.
 

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This is an excerpt from Dominion VA Power's "blue book" regarding this, for an example. Please note: the article #'s are not NEC articles.

240.10 Customer grounding electrode conductor shall not be installed in or routed through Company
meter bases or Current Transformer (CT) cabinets.
240.11 The Customer may connect a bare bonding jumper to the Company meter base provided the
connection is made to a factory installed terminal of adequate size designed exclusively for bonding.
Neither the neutral lug nor any type of add on device shall be used for this purpose. If the bonding wire
exits the meter base separately, the Customer shall install a water tight cable connector or some other
approved device in the bonding conductor exit hole or knockout to prevent the insertion of any object
into the meter base.
 
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