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I am looking at doing 2 things.
1 change my home grounding from the water pipe to ground rods.
2 setup a amateur radio station with proper grounding. this means i will have to add several ground rods, run ground wire around my house to attach to the new electrical ground. i will have 2 masts that attach to the house and antennas will clamp to these with u bolts. i will tie the antennas to the masts with a short ground wire. then i will tie the masts to the ground rod near them. hope this will save 30 to 50 feet of wire. the big question is my gas main. can i run my ground wire on the ground behind it or i may using clips secure it to the brick running about a foot above the earth ground and continue around the house this way. i know lightening takes the least resistance to ground the shortest hop so technically it should never flow behind the gas main.
3 being a 1970s house is it safe to drill these wire clip holders into the brick itself or into the mortar?
 

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The gas piping needs to be bonded to the grounding electrode. And with ground rods any metallic water piping also needs to be bonded.

Sent from my RCT6213W22 using Tapatalk
 
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Your waterline is your primary ground. The rods are supplemental electrodes. All of these need to the together along with and rods for the masts.

Electricity takes all paths, not just the path with the least resistance.
 
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With houses changing over the pipes to PEX more and more, I've seen a couple instances where grounds were left loose, or attached to a section of pipe that then only goes a short distance before switching over to PEX. What's considered best practice these days when installing the ground?
The house I'm building now has ground rods tied in to the foundation rebar since even the muni water supply pipe to the house is PEX.
 

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If there is a metal water pipe exiting the house underground and not known to continue underground as metal for fewer than ten feet then one must be included as a grounding electrode.

The gas plumbing needs to be bonded from a point downstream of the gas meter over to a point on the grounding electrode system. No explicit bonding jumper needs to be strung for this purpose if there is a gas appliance that uses electricity with rigid gas connection and up to date grounded electrical connection.
 

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I am looking at doing 2 things.
1 change my home grounding from the water pipe to ground rods.
2 setup a amateur radio station with proper grounding. this means i will have to add several ground rods, run ground wire around my house to attach to the new electrical ground. i will have 2 masts that attach to the house and antennas will clamp to these with u bolts. i will tie the antennas to the masts with a short ground wire. then i will tie the masts to the ground rod near them. hope this will save 30 to 50 feet of wire. the big question is my gas main. can i run my ground wire on the ground behind it or i may using clips secure it to the brick running about a foot above the earth ground and continue around the house this way. i know lightening takes the least resistance to ground the shortest hop so technically it should never flow behind the gas main.
3 being a 1970s house is it safe to drill these wire clip holders into the brick itself or into the mortar?
This is a very interesting question and a surprising one from one who it appears should appreciate many things, concerning any Amature Radio Station.

Grounding the (Neutral) from the supply from the Power Company is one thing - as regards to the electrical supply.

Grounding any antenna for an "Amature Radio Station" is quite another thing.

It should be fairly obvious that mounting an Amauteur radio antenna may be just a little bit different from mounting an antenna for TV reception.
However, the requirements for such a TV antennae are the least which may/should apply.

https://www.ecmweb.com/code-basics/article-810-radio-and-television-equipment may be a good start for the OP in his/her quest for further information.
 
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