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Ground Fault protection

1609 Views 9 Replies 8 Participants Last post by  Murdy
As I understand it, one GFCI receptical will protect an entire circuit, as long as its placed first in line coming out of the box. Is this correct? My wife (who's actually pretty sharp about these things), says any recepticle within 3 feet of a water source needs to be GFCI, regardless of whether there's another GFCI breaker on the circuit. Who's right?
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· Semi-Pro Electro-Geek
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3,404 Posts
There is never a requirement that any specific receptacle *be* a GFCI receptacle, only that it be GFCI *protected*. Using an upstream GFCI receptacle or a GFCI circuit breaker is always allowed.
 

· Licensed Electrical Cont.
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7,829 Posts
There's that "water source" myth again. :whistling2:

There has never been a "water source" GFI requirement. I have no idea how this myth ever got started.
 

· Master Electrician
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1,453 Posts
While most areas that require GFCI protection are not related to distance from a water source, there 2 2008 code sections that mention distance from a sink. 210.8(A)(7) Laundry, utility, wet bar sinks, and 210.8(B)(5) Sinks [other than dwelling units]. Both sections list within 6 ft of the edge of the sink (not 3 feet).

No circuit that is already protected by a GFCI breaker will require an additional GFCI receptacle.
 

· Registered
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1,157 Posts
actually .. one thing to be a nit-pickler.. the GFI will not protect the "entire network" .. actually, it is listed how many items it will protect. how many recepticals and how many loads (lights, fans, etc.).. who knows.. maybe your house wiring is crazy and you have tonnes of stuff of of one "network" well in excess of code due to shotty work done long before you moved in.

one big difference between a GFCI receptical protecting a "network" and a GFCI breaker doing the same is cost. it is MUCH cheaper to get a GFCI receptical.

also note that there may be some issues with trying to protect sleeping dwellings with a GFCI (not sure why you would want to.. but i mention it here anyway). because these rooms must be arc fault protected. i don't know if it can ALSO be GFCI protected?

Knucklez
 
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