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My dad has a house that no one lives in bad deal. I went by to check on it and some one had thrown snow balls and broke out some windows. He had replaced some of them 2 or3 years ago and reglazed others. The glaze has fellout of them. I replaced some glass in my house 1year ago and it is comeing loose. What are we doing wrong. I dont know what will become of this house would plexiglass stand up better as with snowballs.
 

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What are you using for putty/glazing?
if the wood it really dry It is hard to get the gazing to stick.
You have remove any dirt.
You have to apply some force to the glaze as you are spreading it with a glazing knife.

To stop them from getting broke, Plywood with a few small light slots!

I used to use linseed oil on the wood just brush a little on the wood.
But the current glazing it may not work. Let me check and see if I have a container of glazing.
 

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Give them a call, they can give you the best info.
 

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To Prime or Not To Prime?

Now, this is the point where most books advise you to lightly sand the areas where the old putty was, and then coat the area with a half & half mix of alcohol and linseed oil or an oil- based primer, or pat your head and rub your stomach at the same time. Do you really have to? Good question? The claim is that if you don't, the oils from the new putty will be absorbed into the dry wood and the putty will not stick properly. My rule or thumb is not to prime unless the puttly is so old and dry that it's falling out. Since the wood has been exposed to the elements, priming should be done.
Of course, the wood should be dry and dust-free. You can also wipe the surface with Wilbond, which is a liquid deglosser. This will further clean the surface for better adhesion of the putty.
However, since the manufacturers of glazing compound prefer that you do a preparatory priming of some kind, so I will leave it up to you... if you don't mind delaying your project for up to 24 hours so that the primer can dry, go for it. There is no harm in waiting.
(NOTE: If you are using a latex putty instead of linseed oil-based putty, don't use linseed oil as a primer. Use a quick drying oil or water-based primer sealer instead.)
http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infwindows/infgla.html

I used to work in the hardware store and glazed a lot of windows, things have changed so I did a little research.
 

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Your not going to take the time it but the right but the right way would be to
remove the panes, clean off the old glazing, prime with oil based primer.
Use a tiny bead of glazing, (roll it between your hands and make a thin string and lay that into the sash)
Lay in the new glass, bed it then use new window points and new glazing.
 
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