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Hello,

I added a GFI outlet to the 15 amp circuit to the
outside my garage. I used an outlet in the ceiling of the garage for power. It's always hot and not controlled by a switch. I used my meter and got 120 V at the ceiling outlet after adding 14-2 to the bottom of the existing outlet in the ceiling. I also got 120 v at the newly installed gif. The problem is the GFI trips.


It's not the breaker.

There's power going into the GFI.

I used a PVC conduit.


Stumped*
 

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If this GFI receptacle is the type that can feed other downstream receptacle and protect them, did you nut the downfeeds off so the ground and neutral won't get together.

Any load side leakage or short between neutral and ground will return a small amount of current that represents asymmetry to the GFI and it will trip. All it takes is the load side neutral lightly touching the metal box or the ground wire.
 

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I agree with surferdude2.


Try pulling the GFCI receptacle out of the box with the power off first. Energize the circuit while the GFCI is out of the box and see if the GFCI will reset. If so then you know that it was wires touching while in the box. Just be careful doing this as the screws will have power. Make sure you are connected to the "line" side of the GFCI.
 

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Universal rule for GFCI Trips:

Step 1: Remove everything from the LOAD terminals.

Step 1A: That includes things plugged into the receps, if it’s a GFCI recep.

If GFCI still trips after everything is removed from LOAD -> Bad GFCI device

If GFCI stops tripping after everything is removed from LOAD ->
- Take all the plug-in things into the kitchen and see if they trip the GFCI there
- For hardwired things, that means the downline has a problem. Either something hardwired to it, or something plugged into it, has a ground fault. That needs to be chased down and fixed, and a GFCI is very useful as a tester for that purpose.

After it’s fixed, revisit the question of whether you really want/need to extend GFCI protection to that downline, because that’s what happens when you use LOAD. One should never do this accidentally; not least because Code requires you label receptacles “GFCI Protected”, so you obviously need to know what you are protecting!
 
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