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E-lec-tri-city
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I am installing a GFCI in my kitchen. I was all set to put it in a double gang box along with a 2nd outlet on the LOAD connections.

But then I read the instructions and they say "DO NOT install the GFCI receptacle in an electrical box containing (a) more than four (4) wires (not including the grounding wires) or (b) cables with more than two (2) wires (not including the grounding wire). Contact a qualified electrician if either (a) or (b) are true."

So should I put this in a single box and move the other plug to the other side of the stud bay? The walls are bare down to the studs, so I have lots of options.

Or are they just trying to scare me, and there's really nothing wrong with putting a GFCI in a double box along with another outlet?
 

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i believe they are referring to 4 wires in any single box. So double gang should be fine.
I don;t know the code where you are, but where i am GFCI countertop receptacles have to be rated for 20A on a 20A breaker, be on an independant circuit, with no more than 2 receptacles on the circuit.
 

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E-lec-tri-city
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Discussion Starter #3
I do have a 20A GFCI, but I was going to put three additional receptacles behind it. I guess that's no bueno?
 

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That's a no go where i am. you'd have to check your code, but i can't imagine they'd allow 4 countertop receptacles on the same circuit. US and Canada code is usually fairly indentical
 

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Wrong. There is a limit of 12
On a circuit with regular receptacles yes, but counter top have different rules.
I would be very surprised if code allowed that many counter top receptacles on the same circuit.

There's no way that there's "no limit" on counter top receptacles...you're saying i could put 20 counter top receptacles on the same circuit in the US if i wanted to? i find that hard to believe.
 

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Licensed Electrical Cont.
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Wrong. There is a limit of 12
WRONG! There is NO limit. (Nationally).
Please get your facts straight before making such bold statements. Remember that the OP does have his location in his profile, and it is Texas, USA. :thumbsup:
This is why having your location in your profile, even just the country, is important.


There's no way that there's "no limit" on counter top receptacles...you're saying i could put 20 counter top receptacles on the same circuit in the US if i wanted to? i find that hard to believe.
Yes, there is a way. Yes, we are saying that. If you don't believe it go get yourself a copy of the NEC and find out. That's how I can say this and not guess at it.


That said, no one would ever do this, but it IS possible and legal....UNLESS there is a binding WRITTEN local amendment prohibiting it.
 
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Licensed Electrical Cont.
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OK, so how many receptacles can I put on the load side of a 20A GFCI outlet?
I (personally) typically go no more than 3 downstream of a GFI device.
 

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WRONG! There is NO limit. (Nationally).
Please get your facts straight before making such bold statements. :thumbsup:


Yes, there is a way. Yes, we are saying that. If you don't believe it go get yourself a copy of the NEC and find out. That's how I can say this and not guess at it.


That said, no one would ever do this, but it IS possible and legal....UNLESS there is a binding WRITTEN local amendment prohibiting it.
Wow...i guess the codes aren't as similar as i thought lol, that seems crazy to me.

So how many is standard practice in the US? Do you just always put all counter tops on the same circuit?

Edit: you answered my question as i was typing this :)
 

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I=E/R
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Wow...i guess the codes aren't as similar as i thought lol, that seems crazy to me.
You should update your profile with your province:yes:
The NEC required two 20 amp GFCI protected circuits to serve the counter top receptacle. Is this the same in CA?
We can use 20 amp circuits for lighting but I believe that a previous thread had something in it that said CA required lighting to be on a 15 amp circuit.
 

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Lic Elect/Inspector/CPO
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In the US there is no max number of recepts on a 15 or 20 amp residential circuit. Where max number comes into play is commercial. Each is counted at 180 va, which would be max 10 for 15 amp and 13 for 20 amp.
The kitchen counter outlets require (2) 20 amp seperate circuits, which can also supply certain other areas ie dining room, gas stove and a few others. Local amendments may have other requirements.
 
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