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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I'm connecting my gas meter to my range and tankless water heater as part of a remodel project. The gas meter and tankless are on the exterior of the same wall, while the range is on the interior of that wall (see first diagram). Meanwhile there is electrical meter and panel in the area. The location and connection of the electrical meter and panel are given. The walls are open on the inside (no drywall) as I'm still in the rough-in phase. My question is what is the best way of connecting the gas meter to the tankless and range. Option 1 is to run the pipe along the exterior wall. Option 2 is to run the pipe inside the wall by drilling holes on the 2x4 wall studs. One plumber offered to do it the first way and the other plumber offered to do it the second way. I lean toward option 2 because it is cleaner on the outside and avoids crossing with the electrical. Having the pipe inside the wall also protects it. But I am not a plumber myself and don't know if there could be drawbacks to option 2. Any suggestions? Thanks.

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I usually prefer inside walls. However since your water heater is not the first load I might run exposed to the water heater then reduce size and go into the wall. Tankless gas heaters can use large gas pipes.

Depending on your ambient temps during the cold season the water heater out side might be a real expensive load. Also you have to watch the incoming water temp as to the water heaters production.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I usually prefer inside walls. However since your water heater is not the first load I might run exposed to the water heater then reduce size and go into the wall. Tankless gas heaters can use large gas pipes.

Depending on your ambient temps during the cold season the water heater out side might be a real expensive load. Also you have to watch the incoming water temp as to the water heaters production.
I'm in the Pacific NW, so temperature doesn't get below 30-degree that much. But a few people did suggest me to build a shed around to protect the tankless from the elements and keep the pipe from freezing in the winter.
 
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