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I have a gas line that is running along the bottom of the ceiling trusses in my basement, that Im starting to plan out the finishing of.

The gas line runs parrallel to the heating/ac duct, but I really dont want want to box in an extra foot of ceiling space just to cover up the gas line.

I want to sheetrock the ceiling, so is there anyway to hide the line or move it up into the truss?
 

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If you do not want to use Black Iron, use CSS for the gas lines. Gas companies will not do the work, and plumbers at the most will not do the work, unless it is something that they normally do.

What exactly are you planning on doing, that you do not want to box the Black Iron into the same Soffitt box as the HVAC? You need to think out of the box, and look at the picture in how do you run the Gas piping along the bays between the joists where you need to, then run in the same soffitt area as the hvac.

Not Rocket science, and not something that needs to be over thought. Give me 10 minutes in your basement, and I could probably tell you the best solution to place the piping without over doing it.
 

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I'm in the middle of doing exactly this right now, due to severe space restrictions. We're moving the black pipe over about a foot to run parallel and right next to the supply duct, bringing it into the new mechanical room and into a manifold. We'll branch from there to the other appliances. Each appliance will have its own shut-off at the manifold.
I'm doing a lot of the additional and prep work myself, but I won't touch the gas line. I'll leave that to the licensed gas guy, who I had in to survey and advise on the project before I even started.
The black pipe and gas work is not rocket science, but I prefer to give due respect to those simple things that can have fatal consequences. Call in an expert for this job.
 

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There is no problem as a home owner doing the work yourself. As long as you make sure the fittings are tight, the soap mix does not bubble, all is good. The only time I call in my plumber, is because he has the cutting tool on his truck, if we have to shorten a length of line, or because I do not feel like doing it myself.
 

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There is no problem as a home owner doing the work yourself. As long as you make sure the fittings are tight, the soap mix does not bubble, all is good. The only time I call in my plumber, is because he has the cutting tool on his truck, if we have to shorten a length of line, or because I do not feel like doing it myself.
yeah, i agree. other than leaks, about the only issue i can think of, is not making a spark while there is still gas in the line. but even then, i don't see what little gas is in the line being an issue. oh, and make sure the main shutoff is not leaking.

turn off gas main = check for leak at an appliance connection = disconnect pipe = blow air through the pipe. then do your work.
 

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blowing air, my thought was to get what little gas that is in the line, out. and if the line is open, there is oxygen.
and checking for the main leak, you would have to have the line open, as i could be leaking internally.
 

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There is no physical gas in the line when it is flowing. Natural gas is a vapor, not a Liquid. LPG flows as a vapor, not a liquid. Only fuel that is a physical liquid would be heating oil.

Once you shut off the main at the meter, open the line there is no danger. Even if there is a leak while working on the line, and you are able to stop it, there is no danger. It takes a high amount of vapor in an area that would cause a danger, if there is a spark.
 

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There is no physical gas in the line when it is flowing. Natural gas is a vapor, not a Liquid. LPG flows as a vapor, not a liquid. Only fuel that is a physical liquid would be heating oil.

Once you shut off the main at the meter, open the line there is no danger. Even if there is a leak while working on the line, and you are able to stop it, there is no danger. It takes a high amount of vapor in an area that would cause a danger, if there is a spark.

yes, i know that it is a vapor.


what i didn't know is that there isn't enough in the line to make it a problem.

thanx
 

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This subject of no non licensed people even thinking of touching a gas line is really puzzling to me. Possibly so because from an early age I've never ever considered paying to have gas line work done. In later years I've retired from natural gas compression from the time it came from the dirt deep down mixed with water, propane and all those other unwanted tanes ranging from nearly a vacuum to 1,200 lbs. pressure on lines from 1/4" to 12 inches. Screwed fittings, flanged fittings AND yes the ever so dangerous and absolutely no good compression fittings that a good number of licensed professionals don't have a clue how to correctly connect.

But it seems to be just fine for the non licensed home owner DIY- er to monkey around with electrical they know very little about.

Have you ever smelled electricity when it was becoming dangerous and about to instantly kill you on the spot or to you and your family's well being and about to cause your house to burn? I doubt it. It doesn't yet have mercaptan to warn us.

Natural gas has a upper and lower combustible limit it must be within to even burn. The average is 5 to 15 percent fuel ratio to air for NG and Propane is 2.1 to 10.1 percent. Have you ever seen electric cut you that much slack? I doubt that one too.
 

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Keep minimum code in mind for safety;

"G2415.3 (404.3) Piping in concealed locations. Portions of a piping system installed in concealed locations shall not have unions, tubing fittings, right and left couplings, bushings, compression couplings, and swing joints made by combinations of fittings.

Exceptions:

1. Tubing joined by brazing. 2. Fittings listed for use in concealed locations" From; http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/icod/irc/2009/icod_irc_2009_24_sec015.htm


Garyhttp://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/icod/irc/2009/icod_irc_2009_24_sec015.htmGary
 
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