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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry if this is the wrong place for this. I need to run iron pipe to a stove. There will have to be some corners to go around basement stairs. I read somewhere that you can't use unions for natural gas but have to use left/right couplers. I know it would be a real pain if I did not use anything and had a leak but if I make sure everything is tight would there be a problem. I guess what I am asking is it code that you have to use left/right or is it just for insurance? Thanks
 

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Who ever told you you cant use unions in nature gas doesn't know what they are talking about. Take a look at CSST gas pipe. More expensive but fast and easy. I have used Flashshied+. Do your certification online so you know what you are doing and don't blow up your house.

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Depending on local code you may have to pull a permit to run a gas line.
You’ll also have to have an inline gas cock and drip leg.
Iron is fine. You can use unions, whomever told you they can’t be used isn’t up to speed. Straight thread couplings can’t be used.
A pressure test will have to be done to verify no leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies. I like the idea of csst. Can anyone tell me what size to use. I have 10' of 3/4 pipe coming off the regulator to the furnace. I have a Tee coming off that. It is then right at 50' to where my stove is at? Do I need 3/4 or 1/2"? I will probably be getting it at menards. Seems strange they sell it in 25, 75 and 150' lengths, no 50'.
 

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Doing iron, you’d likely be cutting and threading.
Would you be branching off the gas supply line to the furnace? Or the gas main running in the house? What size is the tee?
Have you investigated what permitting you’ll need and what the pressure test procedures are for your area?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Doing iron, you’d likely be cutting and threading.
Would you be branching off the gas supply line to the furnace? Or the gas main running in the house? What size is the tee?
Have you investigated what permitting you’ll need and what the pressure test procedures are for your area?
That is why I like the idea of csst. When furnace was installed the installer put the Tee in because I told him I would be adding a stove later. It is propane if that makes a difference. The gas company said they will do a leak test. This is in a very rural area. No one seems to get permits for anything.
 

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The piping that supplies the tee and the tee itself have to be of sufficient size to supply the furnace and stove at the same time at full load. Which is why I asked about line size. Which is directly related to BTU loads.
I’d still call your local code office and inquire about gas line permitting.
Remember even with csst you’ll need iron for things like the sediment trap and gas cock.
 

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They will have a instructional / training book that goes with the specific csst you buy. It should have sizing charts and worksheets in it. A standard stove is a pretty low load.

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A 3/4" pipe on propane will run 2 furnaces and a range. I'd say go for it with a 1/2" extension... use csst and it'll be a walk in the park.
 

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The flex line is the way to go and save unless it is punctured or not properly installed. In my county it needs to be installed by a plumber certified for installing it. I ran a line 20 feet to provide gas for a fireplace insert. I did ran the pipe from the fireplace down to the crawlspace so the plumber only had to fun the gas flex line. The savings in labor cost more than made up for the cost of the line. Paid 50 cents a foot for the 3/4 inch CSST line.


Check the tables for the BTU's needed and the length of the line to determine the diameter of the line needed. I could have gotten by with 1/2" line for my fireplace insert but chose 3/4 inch to have capacity later I decided to plumb in a barbeque later.
 

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When we added natural gas service to our house, I bought 21 foot lengths of pipe and fittings. Then I rented a tripod vice and power threader for a day. I plumbed the whole house in that day. That was 1993, no problems so far. It was easy.
In NY galvanized pipe is not allowed for natural gas, hard pipe has to be black pipe. In FL, galvanized pipe is used for natural gas.
 

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you need to start at the first step... you need to draw a diagram with all the piping sizes and lengths to your furnace and to the tee and then how far to stove... need the BTU rating of the furnace and also of the oven stove. Make sure to plan for any future appliances. Many new range/ovens can use 70,ooo BTU. you will never have all burners on and oven. Propane or natural gas makes a big difference... much less gas is needed to flow using propane because it has lots of energy per CU Ft. . I am certified in nat gas pipe sizing but I wont be advising you. It is easy to get certified online to use and buy Flashshield. You will need some special tools and you dont use any tape!!!
 
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