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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Planning for a hardwired garbage disposal in a kitchen renovation. Does the 12/2 NM cable just come in through a hole in the back of the cabinet to get connected at the garbage disposal's built in wire connection cavity? Is there a nice way to bring the cable through the wall that looks a bit more "finished" than just feeding it through a hole in the gyp. bd.? Thanks.
 

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If the disposal is designed to be hardwired, then there are several "whips" which could be used to neaten up the installation. The existing circuit would need to be terminated in a junction box at the wall, then a whip could finish the connection from the box to the disposal with proper wire size, connections and junction box.
 

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I just run the romex directly into the unit. Just keep it up and away from anything in the cabinet. Use a romex connector.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would very much prefer to have a cord and receptacle situation. Do insinkerators (for instance) give an option for either, or are most hardwired?
 

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You have to put in a GFCI outlet underneath, a switch to control the outlet, and yes a cord attached and secured to the Dispo-all. Keep in mind rules vary local to local, so check with your AHJ.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I actually planned for the switch and receptacle, and have it wired that way now. Today I sat back and wondered if the GD had that option, and as I researched installing these things on Youtube, they all seemed to be hardwired, so I thought maybe I made a mistake.
 

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I prefer them plugged into an outlet. It makes it easier to switch a fried one as some lines use a common mounting bracket and you can just twist a new one in place and plug it in. I think most have the option of doing it either way subject to preference and local code. You have to buy the "pigtail" with the plug on one end and the wire connections on the other.
 

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Only problem is, that is not the correct way, and not all jurisdictions allow direct wiring of Romex to the disposal.
Yet again we need more information. According to the 2008 NEC;

422.16 Flexible Cords.

(A) General.
Flexible cord shall be permitted

(1) for the connection of appliances to facilitate their frequent interchange or to prevent the transmission of noise or vibration or


(2) to facilitate the removal or disconnection of appliances that are fastened in place, where the fastening means and mechanical


connections are specifically designed to permit ready removal for maintenance or repair and the appliance is intended

or identified for flexible cord connection.




A flexible cord shall be permitted. It can be hard wired. The switch at the sink can serve as the required disconnect.


If it is cord a plud connected (which is convenient) the receptacle under the sink is not required to be GFI protected.


210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel.
(A) Dwelling Units.


All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in


(1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.


(6) Kitchens — where the receptacles are installed to serve the countertop surfaces


Receptacles for disposals and D/W's do require GFI protection. Again, this all depends on local and state codes and the EI.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the replies and insight. I will check with my building inspector to see if he has any preference or requirements.
 

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So if a GFCI outlet is installed in the wall behind the DW and the DW is plugged into the outlet what does the homeowner need to do to reset the GFCI if there is a nuisance trip?
 

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electures, not every AHJ requires the same restriction. Some actually tighten the restrictions, and the NEC, more than others. That is why it is stated over and over to check with your locals, not rely on web info or the NEC for everything.
 

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So if a GFCI outlet is installed in the wall behind the DW and the DW is plugged into the outlet what does the homeowner need to do to reset the GFCI if there is a nuisance trip?
Only a bubba would put a GFCI behind a DW. Anyone in their right mind would put it in the sink base to be accessible.
 

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Yep. The GFCI is not required UNDER the sink. The rule if for outlets which supply the countertop.
 

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So if a GFCI outlet is installed in the wall behind the DW and the DW is plugged into the outlet what does the homeowner need to do to reset the GFCI if there is a nuisance trip?
The receptacle is not required to be GFI protected. Only counter top receptacles.

"Again, this all depends on local and state codes and the EI."
 

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electures, not every AHJ requires the same restriction. Some actually tighten the restrictions, and the NEC, more than others. That is why it is stated over and over to check with your locals, not rely on web info or the NEC for everything.
Hence, the reason for the last sentence in my post.

"Again, this all depends on local and state codes and the EI."
 

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Only a bubba would put a GFCI behind a DW. Anyone in their right mind would put it in the sink base to be accessible.
Just for fun: So, a line needs to be run from DW to the GFCI outlet in the sink base. Even if they were side by side, you'd need to run NM, MC or something to the sink base and then convert to appropriate plug for the GFCI. More problems caused than solved IMO.
 

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Just for fun: So, a line needs to be run from DW to the GFCI outlet in the sink base. Even if they were side by side, you'd need to run NM, MC or something to the sink base and then convert to appropriate plug for the GFCI. More problems caused than solved IMO.
It depends on the AHJ. If I wired a dw or dispos-all, it would be GFCI breaker or outlet, with BX or armored as it should from the JB to the outlet, to the switch.

As for the GFCI, it should either be a breaker or if a outlet, installed in the sink base in a way that a person can access it without tearing stuff apart.
 

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Just for fun: So, a line needs to be run from DW to the GFCI outlet in the sink base. Even if they were side by side, you'd need to run NM, MC or something to the sink base and then convert to appropriate plug for the GFCI. More problems caused than solved IMO.
Kitchen appliances are not required to be GFI protected. Follow the link in my signature and verify what code your state has adopted. Otherwise, safe your money.
 
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