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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wiring receptacles for my tig welder. 6 gage then in 3/4 conduit is my current plan. The EMT is being mounted over drywall.

The unanticipated complication has come up due to my desire to wire more than receptacles so that I can place my welder at different places in my garage depending on what area of the car i am working on.

What would be my most cost effective code compliant method for doing this, preferably with materials available at a big box store. my thinking is I could add a 6 space panel and run 4x 8 gage in the conduit, split nut connections to connect my bonding for the box to the ground conductor (I bought 6 gage bare copper and that package is already opened.)
 

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Red Seal Electrician
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Check your tig's user manual for circuit/wire size recomendations. #6 will support a huge machine... probably needing a 100A breaker to avoid nuisance tripping.
 

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The metallic conduit can be your ground. You would just need jumpers to the box from the receptacle.

Do you really need a neutral?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I need a 6-50R receptacle, the welder has a 3 prong plug, so I'm not running a neutral. The highest rated input load is 22.5 amps so I don't need more than 30a but I'm building to support something bigger in the future. I am inheriting my dad's sears arc welder from the 70s and all I know is I used to know when my dad was using it because the lights would dim everywhere.



What I'm finding in extension cords is running around $75. for $28 I can get a panel and 2 breakers at $15 each and it adds up to less, plus I'm saving $23 going from 6 ga to 8 ga, and everything is in stock
 

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Is this a small garage / welding shop in the making? Where you will be welding frequently? Long term setup? Multiple projects at once? So, that you're wanting to run permanent welding outlets to two or four sides of a garage space, move the welder around as needed. Or just occasional use? Because that's a lot of cost in hardware, conduit, wire, receptacles ... versus a simple extension cord, one uses when needed. Most people have one welding outlet in a strategic location. A welding extension cord if needed ... if they can't rotate the item around or turn the vehicle around ( no motor, ... ) on something like vehicle dollies or the space is simply too small.
 

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Red Seal Electrician
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We have a big old Thunderbolt stick machine at work. It will easily run on #10 within the confines of a std double-garage. Normally with these, a longer stinger and ground cord is used instead of more AC power cord. If it is a really big machine, it needs to be hardwired since a 6-50R isn't enough.
 

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If you look around you can buy a molded welders cord for a lot less than pipe and wire

I decided I wanted one and just kept looking ended up getting a 50' 6 -3 copper for about 120 dollars used off of CL.

The real trick is what is the total load of the welder? I have a Hobart 210 MVP. Comes with the standard 50 amp plug and a conversion plug for 20 amps 120v. I was interested so I read the manual cover to cover. Full loading is 18 amps on either voltage. Yet it has the 50 amp plug.

Unless your planning on doing 1/2" structural welding a 8 gauge cord would probably be fine.
 

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If you look around you can buy a molded welders cord for a lot less than pipe and wire

I decided I wanted one and just kept looking ended up getting a 50' 6 -3 copper for about 120 dollars used off of CL.

The real trick is what is the total load of the welder? I have a Hobart 210 MVP. Comes with the standard 50 amp plug and a conversion plug for 20 amps 120v. I was interested so I read the manual cover to cover. Full loading is 18 amps on either voltage. Yet it has the 50 amp plug.

Unless your planning on doing 1/2" structural welding a 8 gauge cord would probably be fine.
I just made my own extension wire for my old stick welder and if I need to take it somewhere I'm all set. I have numerous plugs too in case I encounter a different kind of recepical.
 

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I need a 6-50R receptacle, the welder has a 3 prong plug, so I'm not running a neutral. The highest rated input load is 22.5 amps so I don't need more than 30a but I'm building to support something bigger in the future.
That's great, except there is no limit to the number of 30A receptacles on a 30A circuit, but a 50A circuit is limited to 1 receptacle.

One argument in favor of running a neutral is novice EVers incorrectly believe NEMA 14-50 is the standard EV charging socket, so home buyers will coo and say "Oh look, the house is EV ready" and increase their offer by a grand or three. I for one hate catering to the ignorant, but one always profits from doing so lol. In their defense, a 14-50 will support an RV (large recreational vehicle). A 6-50 won't.

#8 copper or #6 aluminum will support 50A but only if it is the only circuit in the conduit.


(I bought 6 gage bare copper and that package is already opened.)
Harper's Rule: Buy the wire LAST. After all the information is gathered.
The trick is knowing when that is lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
20x24 garage with a 4 post lift. When I planned the garage the lift is on the east wall, the garage door is on the north wall and the electric outlets are on the west wall. I can use the east half for a second car but not with everything else in the garage so mostly the west half will be where the lift and car reside and it's largely electric free so I can tent it off for painting and not worry about paint fumes reacting with electric.

I Was expecting to get a Lincoln Square wave tig like I used in college but I got a harbor freight competitor. At this point I have 5 projects lined up that are going to need rust repair body panel replacement work and the first project in the lineup also has a lot of frame welding as it will be a 1956 F100 on a 1996 S10 4WD frame.

Someday if I live long enough adding a Bridgeport mill would be nice, and I might like to build tube frame autocross vehicles. But that might exceed my ambition and get replaced with watching the sunset and yelling at kids to get off my lawn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
That's great, except there is no limit to the number of 30A receptacles on a 30A circuit, but a 50A circuit is limited to 1 receptacle.

One argument in favor of running a neutral is novice EVers incorrectly believe NEMA 14-50 is the standard EV charging socket, so home buyers will coo and say "Oh look, the house is EV ready" and increase their offer by a grand or three. I for one hate catering to the ignorant, but one always profits from doing so lol. In their defense, a 14-50 will support an RV (large recreational vehicle). A 6-50 won't.

#8 copper or #6 aluminum will support 50A but only if it is the only circuit in the conduit.

The garage does have its own 100a subpanel.

Harper's Rule: Buy the wire LAST. After all the information is gathered.

The trick is knowing when that is lol.

Yeah, when I was reading about what code allows the impression I got was NEC doesn't limit number of receptacles but IRC does... and the absence of anything other than giant wire nuts which would feel a little sketchy in a welding circuit seemed to suggest maybe I should just stay away from the idea.

As to setting up for an EV... that feels like a "when they pry it from my cold dead hands" kind of thing to me, but I may live long enough to change my mind. We'll see. When that day comes, I did build the garage with a 100A subpanel and there will probably be enough space on the panel for another double pole breaker.

But for now I'm adding a wall AC and a propane furnace so I can keep on trucking no matter how much the globe warms or cools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·




Completed. Welder outlets on the bottom with the subpanel for the 2 circuits above the compressor.



Dammit now I realize as I say that I may have a problem.
 

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