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Discussion Starter #1
hello everybody,
I have the project to make my double car garage a working shop in my recently bought house.
the inside actual garage has no wall (meaning no plaster or plywood on a walls), I can see the studs standing every 16", also no ceiling.
outside is stucco and tile on roof, between the stud and the stucco is only a vapor barrier with some kind of paper (black), no plywood or OSB sheeting at all.

i want put plywood on wall for an easy setup of a lot of cabinets, what is your best advice to insulate my garage walls ?
 

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Well, where do you live? That may have something to do with insulation. My walls are insulated with the kraft backed Johns Mansville roll insulation like they put in every house around these parts.

R38 blown insulation in the ceiling. And a split system AC mounted on the wall. Last week when it was over 100 outside, it was 74 in the shop. :eek::thumbsup:

Don't forget to run your electrical before closing up the wall.
 

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Most plywood, of a thickness to back cabinets is a 1 perm vapor retarder or less. With that on the inside, IMO, it is risky to use rigid foamboard/cavity fill inside the studs, a double vapor barrier. The edges of the studs would still be exposed to capillary draw from the stucco (water reservoir) cladding- by means of the water-wicking paper, especially if on a solar-exposure side after a drizzle/rain. Older garage, usually a single layer of tar paper with minimal gap to the cement product for drainage. You couldn't just use plywood rips (12") across the studs for cabinet backing? Then the wall could dry both ways; using this combination. Will the garage be conditioned?

Where in CA... there are 16 different climate energy zones; http://www.energy.ca.gov/maps/renewable/building_climate_zones.html

Pick one...

Gary
 

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Depending on climate you may also want/need to insulate the garage door, esp if it is a single-wall steel type. I did mine with pink foam board insulation covered with another layer of foil backed insulation. If you do similar you will need to change or adjust your garage door springs for the added weight. No more freezing temps and and separating waxes, etc. :)
 

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Depending on climate you may also want/need to insulate the garage door, esp if it is a single-wall steel type. I did mine with pink foam board insulation covered with another layer of foil backed insulation. If you do similar you will need to change or adjust your garage door springs for the added weight. No more freezing temps and and separating waxes, etc. :)
My house had the thin sheet metal door and it faced the western sun. Burn your hands, don't ya know. I also cut to fit sheet insulation and it helped some. The fix was to replace the door with an energy efficient insulated door. That works well. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am at Paso Robles.

I am confuse, can I insulate like that (foam or other product) between studs, then cover with plywood ?
 

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I agree about the insulated door. They can make a huge difference.

I still would put some rigid foam inside the wall and shoot to the back of that if you decide to foam the walls. I don't think spray foam to the back side of the felt is a good idea.

Given the type of exterior that you have, I would space the cabinets from the wall slightly and allow for some air circulation as well as periodic inspection (i.e. easier leak detection).

Be very careful putting anything on the inside of that wall that is moisture sensitive when it comes to insulation.
 

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I think there is an echo in here... lol.

Gary
 
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