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So my wife and I moved just last year to a home with an 1100 sq ft unfinished basement. I'd been saving up for a giant man cave with a home theater, exercise room and a kids playroom.

Anyway, my mother-in-law has become sick and might be moving in much sooner then we'd ever expected. So the basement's being redesignated as a mil suite.

The house was built in 2000, poured walls and floors and about 10' ceilings. A few questions about framing a basement,
-Can I attach pressure treated 2" x 2" directly to the walls?
-I believe the sill plates need to be pt lumber, but can those be applied directly to the floor or is any foam or paper required between?

Thanks for your help,
Dave
 

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In a nut-shell: Use sill sealer suggested under p.t. plate (use HD or SS nails) for thermal/capillary break, use s.s. behind wall wood furring, if so, p.t. not required there, location states insulation required, R-10 (2") foam board suggested, air seal/foam board rims,no vapor barrier or retarder below grade, egress window required in bedrooms, ADA on drywall, get a permit for this conversion. Any questions, copy and paste, I will give you the sites to explain it.

Gary
 

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you can also just space the wall about an inch or so out from the concrete. keep in mind that the concrete is more than likely out of square. spacing it out a little can help you make your walls more square. In my area since a basement build is only partition walls i only attached to the floor and floor trusses above and to an ajoining wall if there was one. i did not attach to the concrete walls at all. mine passed with no prob.
 

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I forgot to mention fire-block the wall -at a stud- every 10' lineally so a fire in the wall outlet cannot travel the length of the wall and reach all the floor joist cavities above to travel across the floor and start a fire 40' away and 1 floor up. Top plate requires fire-blocking it's length when wall is perpendicular to joists. You have to block any gap behind and above the stud wall; http://publicecodes.citation.com/icod/irc/2009/icod_irc_2009_3_sec002_par031.htm


Gary
 

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So my wife and I moved just last year to a home with an 1100 sq ft unfinished basement. I'd been saving up for a giant man cave with a home theater, exercise room and a kids playroom.

Anyway, my mother-in-law has become sick and might be moving in much sooner then we'd ever expected. So the basement's being redesignated as a mil suite.

The house was built in 2000, poured walls and floors and about 10' ceilings. A few questions about framing a basement,
-Can I attach pressure treated 2" x 2" directly to the walls?
-I believe the sill plates need to be pt lumber, but can those be applied directly to the floor or is any foam or paper required between?

Thanks for your help,
Dave
I finished a basement like this a few years ago. The best approach is to frame a standard 2x4 wall in front of the concrete wall. Even if the basement is dry, it's best to waterproof anyway.

A 2x4 stud wall gives you more room to run wires/pipes, you don't have to deal with the hassle of trying to fasten to the concrete wall, and you can then run a watertight unbroken vapor barrier. It's much easier to build, and there's room for insulation where you need it.

I coated my poured walls with foundation sealer, then put 4 mil black vapor barrier, floor to ceiling, with the joints taped. Installed 2x4 wall with PT sill, fastened to floor and rafters above and installed insulation.

Be sure to test for radon first, as this may change your plans dramatically.
 
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