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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

Very new to framing and I was doing a DIY in my basement.
I ended up using 2x4's instead of the recommended 2x6's which has caused my frames to not reach the edge of the beams they are under. It was mentioned by some friends that this would cause pains when drywalling.

Is there any way to convert these 2x4's to 2x6's?
I tried searching online but the terms used were a bit too confusing for me.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You mean you can't brace the top of wall? Put blocking between the floor joists to brace top of wall if so.
I don't think I mean bracing but I might be wrong.
Let me try to explain the situation further in words.

So I have a 2x4 frame built under a beam that seems to be 6" wide.
Due to this I have a section under the beam that does not have the 2x4 frame.
Since there's this missing portion I cannot just do a flat drywall against the frame because the beam is pushed out at the top. In order to fix this I wanted to extend the 2x4 frame by 2 inches.

Does that make more sense as to what my intentions are?
 

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If it's just a partition wall, you should be able to simply tack a 2" sleeper strip to the studs.
Might be easier to take it down and rebuild using 2x6s though.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If it's just a partition wall, you should be able to simply tack a 2" sleeper strip to the studs.
Might be easier to take it down and rebuild using 2x6s though.
I actually framed the whole basement which is why I didn't want to have to remove this frame :(. Yeah it is a partition wall connected to another wall and it has some soffits connected above it now. Can you explain what a sleeper strip is exactly and how I should be connecting it to the partition wall?

I'll be taking down the other 2x4 partition wall which isn't connected to anything other than the beam above it and replacing it with a 2x6 wall.
 

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I have gas!
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What I mean is... If you need the width of a 2x6 then cut a 2x down to 2" then screw (or glue and screw) it right to of the face of the stud.
Basically build up the 2x4 to the dimension of a 2x6.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What I mean is... If you need the width of a 2x6 then cut a 2x down to 2" then screw (or glue and screw) it right to of the face of the stud.
Oh okay another probably dumb question. Should I just be screwing these pieces one at a time or should I make another full frame and then put this up against the other frame and screw them together? As well, what kind of glue should I use and what size of screws? Thanks!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I will actually try to remove both frames. Might as well redo them while I still can. Getting the nails out of the cement doesn't look like a fun task though :(
 

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How many feet of wall have you put up so far?
My thought was to get a bunch of 2" pieces and put them up individually. With that said, I'm not 100% certain on what you've done so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
How many feet of wall have you put up so far?
My thought was to get a bunch of 2" pieces and put them up individually. With that said, I'm not 100% certain on what you've done so far.
I have framed 3 walls. There's one wall which I messed up which I'll be removing to replace with a 2x6 wall. There's the wall that I was initially talking about that's connected to another 2x4 wall. Both the potential 2x6 walls are under a beam that's around 6 inches wide. That being said should my wall that's perpendicular to the 2x6 wall be 2x6 as well or can that still be a 2x4 wall?
 

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retired framer
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Hi there,

Very new to framing and I was doing a DIY in my basement.
I ended up using 2x4's instead of the recommended 2x6's which has caused my frames to not reach the edge of the beams they are under. It was mentioned by some friends that this would cause pains when drywalling.

Is there any way to convert these 2x4's to 2x6's?
I tried searching online but the terms used were a bit too confusing for me.

Thanks!
If your 2x4 is flush with one side of the bean, just add a 2x2 plate under the other side and put 2x4 on the flat flush with the other side.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the help everyone. Should I post another question in this thread or begin a new thread?

I just need help seeing if I'm missing anything in my basement renovation check list.

So far I have the following:

1. Plan out area design and label where all electrical will be going.
2. Obtain building and electrical permits.
3. Framing on the outside walls of the house is already completed + insulated by builder so I can skip this step.
4. Framed my interior walls of all rooms.
5. Run electrical to lights, light switches, power outlets, cat5, coax, etc.
6. Get electrical inspection.
7. Drywall?
8. Flooring?
9. ?

I'm a bit confused as to what I need to do after electrical and whether or not my steps up until there were correct.
 

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Contractor/Engineer
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Assuming you have 2X4 left over from the framing - rip them to the thickness you need to meet the beam edges, and face nail/screw them to the 2X4 wall as everyone else has said.

Or, simply sheetrock up to the beam and then box the beam in pine to make it pretty (albeit rustic).
Y
ou'll want to texture/prime/paint the walls and ceiling before you do the finish floor and trim. (Sometimes the trim will already be on, also.)

Where is any consideration for HVAC? Perhaps I missed that in other comments.

You might want insulation in some walls to deaden sound and/or isolate unheated areas, such as furnace room/laundry/storage...
 

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retired framer
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Interior wall are always 2x4 except for bearing walls that are already there or wet walls where big pipes with be.
At the top of the walls you need 2x4 blocks between the joist every 2 ft and one at any loose end to nail the wall to and provide backing for drywall.
 

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These are willy nilly additions. Take the relevant ones for you.


All rough. You need to get these inspected (do you have the permit?) one thing at a time. You do electrical then call for electrical inspection. Then plumb and call for that. DO NOT cover anything until these are done. Another is fire inspection. Do you have all fire blocks and egresses? Any hole/gap connecting the bsmt wall to the floor above must be sealed off. Mineral insulation at least 2" and fire foam/caulk all passed for me. In NJ. Also blocks of wood, thick enough drywall, all standard materials with one hour resistance to flame. This is along the new wall and behind it. Rest of the ceiling is not. The boiler/furnace/water heater that uses flame call for drywall/fire block above. Also make up air for the hvac and smoke/co alarms.
Another is metal plates over all elect and plumb. Check the videos on how.



Widening the wall: don't take the wall down. This is not load bearing wall and adding nominal 2" is the BEST solution.:smile: Measure the existing girder and you can use 2x2 sold at the box stores or cut your own to fit the numbers. If 2x2 is too little, how about ripping some shims out of thin stock to fatten? If 2x2 is too much, rip it down or use 5/4 or combo of 1x furring strips and shims. In this case best are screws because if you pound on the existing wall for nails, you can move the framing pieces.


Once you have ok on all rough work, cover with drywall, trim then prime. Priming also shows mud work mistakes and little gaps in the trim. Then floor and then finish paint. If any mud work is done again, spot prime. Any finger prints, spot prime.
 
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