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I'm installing 48x80 french doors on an interior wall (I don't think it is load bearing). Unfortunately, the studs don't work out as I would like them to so I'm going to have to install a new king and jack stud on each side and cut the 3 studs in the opening. Couple of questions: 1) is there any way to get the new king and jack studs in without pulling the drywall back another three inches beyond the rough opening of 50x82? 2) what size header would you recommend? The house width is 30ft, one floor only - so 2 2x8s according to Table R602.7(2) - and I'll need to remove the drywall there also to get access to install, correct? My husband seems to think there's a way to do this without removing extra drywall around the sides and above the rough opening that we then have to replace - while it seems like it may be possible to tuck the king stud back 3" behind the existing drywall, it seems as though it would be awkward to work it that way. Appreciate any guidance you can offer! I apologize if the photo is sideways.
 

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retired framer
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I'm installing 48x80 french doors on an interior wall (I don't think it is load bearing). Unfortunately, the studs don't work out as I would like them to so I'm going to have to install a new king and jack stud on each side and cut the 3 studs in the opening. Couple of questions: 1) is there any way to get the new king and jack studs in without pulling the drywall back another three inches beyond the rough opening of 50x82? 2) what size header would you recommend? The house width is 30ft, one floor only - so 2 2x8s according to Table R602.7(2) - and I'll need to remove the drywall there also to get access to install, correct? My husband seems to think there's a way to do this without removing extra drywall around the sides and above the rough opening that we then have to replace - while it seems like it may be possible to tuck the king stud back 3" behind the existing drywall, it seems as though it would be awkward to work it that way. Appreciate any guidance you can offer! I apologize if the photo is sideways.
Hubby has a good imagination and it can be done.


The biggest trick will be to rid the nails from above into the studs.


A multi saw would take care of those, leave the bottom plate in place for now.
Put the king studs in carefully in the right spot, a drywall screw on each side top and bottom will hold it in place while you drive angled screws into the top and bottom plate.
Cut one end of the header on an angle 53" on the bottom and 52" on the top. You can take more if needed
That will allow you to swing it up into place square end first.
Once in place set the jack stud against the king at the top on both side and then tap the jack into place. That will push the header up tight.


You can screw stuff in place thru the drywall, just keep driving and you just have some holes to fill.
 

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It is very important that you determine load bearing or not beyond a shadow of a doubt.
 
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retired framer
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It is very important that you determine load bearing or not beyond a shadow of a doubt.
Thanks I missed that, our headers start at a double 2x10 and get bigger with load and when the load gets bigger it might need more jack studs and a longer header.
 

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You're framing for double doors that you want to have extremely stable for another 30 years.

You want to do the job once - Right?

Don't mess around trying invent a new way to frame it because you might have to do some extra taping on the wallboard.

You could remove the wallboard on the entire wall on either the inside or outside of the room. What will it be - something like 5 or 6 sheets? So, you use a little more mud and some more screws - but the wall will look great. If you're worried about taping to the sealing - throw up some crown and make it a classy room.

The important thing is making the Kings stable - I'd even consider doubling them that way, with the jack included you have a pretty stable frame to hang those new doors on.

The rest of the work is just taping and painting (don't forget to prime) and smiling as you look at the new doors!

Believe me, the priority is NOT saving yourself the trouble or taping some sheetrock.
 
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