DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The framing in my basement is 2x4s cut in halves lengthwise, so 2x2ish. Is that ok for drywall? It was panels on it before.
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
38,887 Posts
The framing in my basement is 2x4s cut in halves lengthwise, so 2x2ish. Is that ok for drywall? It was panels on it before.
Not great if the teenagers have wrestling matches beside it.
Interior wall?
Exterior wall, against concrete or, insulation or?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Is the barrier against the concrete or the studs?
Barrier is against concrete behind studs. I would use shorter screws to fit the depth of these studs. Think it would be alright? It's not going to be anything fancy down here.
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
38,887 Posts
Barrier is against concrete behind studs. I would use shorter screws to fit the depth of these studs. Think it would be alright? It's not going to be anything fancy down here.

Basements have a habit of smelling musty and should be considered
Concrete pretty much stays at a constant temperature especially that which is below ground level. So with out insulation your wall will be some where between room temp and concrete temp.
Moisture in the air will be attracted to it and take dust with it. That is all you need for mold and mildew, food and moisture, and it starts behind furniture where you have less air flow.


Are you sure you don't want to put some insulation in?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Barrier is against concrete behind studs. I would use shorter screws to fit the depth of these studs. Think it would be alright? It's not going to be anything fancy down here.

Basements have a habit of smelling musty and should be considered
Concrete pretty much stays at a constant temperature especially that which is below ground level. So with out insulation your wall will be some where between room temp and concrete temp.
Moisture in the air will be attracted to it and take dust with it. That is all you need for mold and mildew, food and moisture, and it starts behind furniture where you have less air flow.


Are you sure you don't want to put some insulation in?
Yeah cant really afford it. There are openings at 2 of 3 sides of the room, for the water access and one for circuit breaker access that is concrete, maybe that will help it breath? The 4th side is where the steps are which divide the basement from the unfinished side, so that side should be fine with whatever.

I'm assuming insulation isn't going to fit in these 2x2s?

Now I'm wondering if I should just go for smooth panel board like this https://m.lowes.com/pd/47-75-in-x-7-98-ft-Smooth-Brown-Hardboard-Wall-Panel/3014304

any experience with it? How is it cut? Look pretty decent painted? I already got drywall for the ceiling which has recessed lights, but I suppose I could take it back. Reason why I'm not doing drop ceiling is because of the height of the windows, dont want to have to make a weird ramp or box to them. Wonder if this paneling could work for ceiling as well.

Lot of questions, thanks for the help.
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
38,887 Posts
Yeah cant really afford it. There are openings at 2 of 3 sides of the room, for the water access and one for circuit breaker access that is concrete, maybe that will help it breath? The 4th side is where the steps are which divide the basement from the unfinished side, so that side should be fine with whatever.

I'm assuming insulation isn't going to fit in these 2x2s?

Now I'm wondering if I should just go for smooth panel board like this https://m.lowes.com/pd/47-75-in-x-7-98-ft-Smooth-Brown-Hardboard-Wall-Panel/3014304

any experience with it? How is it cut? Look pretty decent painted? I already got drywall for the ceiling which has recessed lights, but I suppose I could take it back. Reason why I'm not doing drop ceiling is because of the height of the windows, dont want to have to make a weird ramp or box to them. Wonder if this paneling could work for ceiling as well.

Lot of questions, thanks for the help.
Allowing the wall to breath is worse, then warm moist air from the basement can be sucked in there and water will condense on the colder barrier and now you are causing mold behind the wall.


If you want to drop the ceiling there is a trick for the window.
Put a piece of drywall just in front of the window, fill the nails or screws.
Build a 3 sides box from 2x4 from the molding department of the store.
Then just run the drop ceiling up to the outside of the 2x4s.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top