DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
retired framer
Joined
·
61,674 Posts
Hi, Thanks in advance for any input on my situation..!

I’m building an 8’x10’ office room in my unfinished detached garage and had a few questions.

I'm planning to frame out 2 walls and use the existing garage studs for the other 2 walls. I was going frame out the walls first then put some self-leveling underlayment as the slab slopes from the rear to the front of the garage, then just put vinyl plank flooring on that. (I’m in Southern California to insulating the floor is less of an issue (?))

The existing garage studs are about 2 1/2 inches back because of the foundation stem wall. Do I just connect the new wall to the existing studs at the top plate with a steel L shaped plate or is there a standard way to do this?

Also since the ceiling joists won’t have a wall to sit on I’ve read you can do a ‘cut in ribband’ is this a good idea? Not sure if notching out the studs will weaken them significantly. Also there won’t be anything on top of this ceiling besides a few light boxes from the garage..

Any input on any of this is much appreciated..

Thanks!
View attachment 673874 View attachment 673875 View attachment 673876
Self levelling doesn't always go well are you sure you need to level it?
The normal would just to build a ledge over the curb at what ever height.
Rectangle Font Parallel Logo Drawing

But if you want smooth wall you could do stud height and do the ceiling on top of these wall.
Both old and new walls would need to be fire stopped.
Rectangle Parallel Font Symbol Wood

Don't forget that every stud will be different height.
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
61,674 Posts
Thanks for these! - a flat wall would be best I supposed - I just don't want to lose that extra 6" of room space. I've seen where people will leave the concrete exposed then cover it with trim later..

For the flooring i'm sure it is sloping, the top of the stem wall is level but measuring in a few spots shows it slopes down. I wonder if it was done to drain any water from back to front? I believe this house is in a potential flood zone near a dam, which being in SoCal is unlikely to flood. You said that self-leveling doesn't always go well, I've seen where someone trims wood with the top being level and screeds to the top - maybe that would help..
View attachment 674168 View attachment 674170
Yes usually the garage is 1/8" per foot slope toward the door. So in ten feet it would be 1 1/4". If you self level make sure you have a couple helpers.
If you do that I would put down the treated bottom plate and then the self levelling before you build the walls.
Then you just build the walls with another bottom plate.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top