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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Is this a common practice? let's say i have a simple 16x24 shed, and i want the walls to be 12 feet high, but i only have 8 foot boards. can i frame my 8 foot walls, then frame another wall that is 4 feet to rest directly on top of that wall with no floor in between? is there anything structurally wrong with that? example pictures/sketches would be nice

and while I'm here, is it necessary to sheath the wall when i'm going to put wooden clapboard on anyway? can the clapboard be attached directly to the studs, to brace and square it, or should i also sheath it?

thanks!
 

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Maryland
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Why not just purchase 12' studs? Or have you already purchased all of your lumber for the project in 8' lengths?

I live in a house that is sided with wood clapboards nailed directly to the studs, no sheathing. This thing has been standing for 130 years, so unless local code dictates otherwise, you should be fine with just clapboards. Personally though, as inexpensive as it would be, I would sheath and wrap it before installing the siding.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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No it it is not common practice as the wall will not have sufficient rigidity. The wall will want to bend at that joint. Especially without any sheathing. Current building practices use the sheathing to tie the base plate to the studs to the top plate. I doubt your building inspector will approve.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Why not just purchase 12' studs? Or have you already purchased all of your lumber for the project in 8' lengths?
Well, the barn is going to be taller than it is wide, (14 feet tall, 10 or 12 feet wide) so it will be difficult to frame and raise the 14 foot walls, which is why i was thinking of making it two separate walls on top of one another.

Since it is going to have a loft at 8 feet high, would the beam that runs from one side of the wall to the other to hold the loft floor up be sufficient enough to hold the walls together and prevent it wanting to move out at that joint when weight is applied to the top (snow, etc)?

I'm basically trying to frame a building that would typically be done with posts and beams, but instead using studs. this is the only logical way i could figure out how to do it. i don't see how i could balloon frame it, as the walls are taller than the building is wide, unless i had a boom to lift the walls into place once they're built. it seems framing a 4 foot wall directly on top a 8 foot wall is the only solution, as long as i tie the outside walls together so they don't bend out at that joint...

if you want a visual, this is the layout i'm going for: http://i.imgur.com/yuueK.jpg

outside view: http://i.imgur.com/Da5HV.jpg
 

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If you can't figure out how to stand up a full height wall,I think you are in for an eye opener when you try to lift a second section on top of an 8 foot standing wall.


Standing a wall the size you describe is not something you need a machine for-2 guys and some drag boards--Mike---
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Standing a wall the size you describe is not something you need a machine for-2 guys and some drag boards--Mike---
Clarify? standing a 14 foot wall that was framed on a 12 foot floor does not sound like the job for 2 people to me. 2 feet of the wall will be hanging off the end. it has to be raised and at the same time pulled back until it's resting on the floor before it can be fully raised. i imagine a 14 foot wall that is 20 feet or so long will be quite heavy to maneuver around like that
 

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When raising a wall the bottom plate usually gets toenailed to the flooring at the chalk line.

These nails act like hinges--they will bend over are you stand the wall.

Drag boards are nailed to the framing and act as your props when the wall is standing.

Cleats are nailed to the flooring before the wall is sheeted.(2x4 scrap.)

I've stood up 2 story gable end walls almost 30 feet tall and 20 wide with 5 guys and wall jacks.

If you don't have the manpower to lift the whole wall at once --then consider building the wall in two sections and raising them side by side,---That will only cost you one extra stud.---Mike---
 

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Framer
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Have you considered stick framing your walls? Secure your bottom plate to the concrete or floor, (where ever it will be permeant) toe nail studs to bottom plate and use a ladder to nail the top plates on after.. just as heavy as one stud at the time..

Hope that helps
 

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Your issue isn't code it's engineering. It should be planned and engineered. As a framer for 20 plus years I can say that wall can be stood without equipment and should be framed full length. Even if you needed a crane it's worth the money to frame with full length studs. The small pony wall on top of the other will creat a knee/ hinge point. If I built it I'd probably use 2x6 with a few lvl post on 3x plates on a suitable foundation with hd's attached to the post bp's and I would sheet it as well. I would also run a row of fire blocks at 8 feet.
 
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