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Is copper an option?

I would put that inside of pvc conduit so it does not happen again especially since it is all open and accessible if it is allowed. I don't know if you can put that type cable inside conduit.

If not allowed I would purchase cable that could be put inside conduit.
 

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Is copper an option?

I would put that inside of pvc conduit so it does not happen again especially since it is all open and accessible if it is allowed. I don't know if you can put that type cable inside conduit.

If not allowed I would purchase cable that could be put inside conduit.
Well, no cable is intended to be run through conduit.. But individual conductors are -- the same kind that are used inside of the SER cable (XHHW conductors).
 

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And I don't trust them, Al needs to be re-torqued, in time it "gives" and the contact pressure drops. Heating in that area leads to problems, even if Noalox is used.
On what do you base your assertion that aluminum cable terminations needs to be re-torqued? How often do you expect that would need to be done?

If that were actually required by the US National Electrical Code (NEC) then I would never have installed a single foot of the stuff. In 4 years of apprenticeship and decades of code and practice updates the need for re-torquing Aluminum connections was never presented. What was emphasized over and over was that it is essential to torque the connections to the specification using the correct tools during installation. If you are correct then, even though I'm now retired and no longer have a vehicle suitable for service work, I would have to do a lot of customer follow up visits to inform them of the danger that the absence of this "Industry standard" or "Code required practice" puts them in. That is a whole lot of people that would be truly angry with me for not having taken care of it sooner. If it really is required by good practice or Code I should have informed the customer about it at the time of installation. What I actually would have done is to install HyPress terminal tails on every aluminum cable end in order to avoid the issue. Re-torquing those is forbidden by instructions included in the listing or labeling which would protect me from any liability for a connection failure as long as I had installed the high pressure crimp on terminal adapters properly and torqued them to specification during installation. I cannot see it as at all likely that the entire industry, at least in the areas I have worked, would have ignored the need for this if it is real. Dam I hope your wrong!

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Is copper an option?

I would put that inside of pvc conduit so it does not happen again especially since it is all open and accessible if it is allowed. I don't know if you can put that type cable inside conduit.

If not allowed I would purchase cable that could be put inside conduit.
Of course the cable can be installed in conduit but a conduit of an acceptable size would not fit inside a 3&1/2 inch deep stud cavity. The cable must be measured at the opposing points that yield the largest diameter and the cross sectional area of the conduit has to be twice the cross sectional area derived from the radius thus obtained. Single conductors or cables cannot exceed 50% fill. Schedule 40 PVC conduit is not a lot more resistive to damage from power tools than the cable itself is. To be effective protection it would have to be fiberglass, because the fibers would jam the tool, Schedule 80 conduit, or metal conduit. It might be cheaper to cover the stud or joist bay with sheet metal thick enough to meet the requirement for protective plates when cables are to close to the face of the framing members.

None of that is at all likely to get done because it is not required. That cable was damaged by another craft and they should be made to replace it at their expense. If you replace it for just the cost of materials then you are giving them quite a gift.

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Tom Horne
 

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On what do you base your assertion that aluminum cable terminations needs to be re-torqued? How often do you expect that would need to be done?
In 4 years of apprenticeship and decades of code and practice updates the need for re-torquing Aluminum connections was never presented.
Reinspection of torque is based on NECA/AA 104 and on manufacturer recommendations - for those listed connectors. Actually that's the reason why in military installations they are not allowing Al conductors.
Current cycling makes variable heat. That expands/contracts the conductors and leads to that loosening of Al connection in time (UL tests for 500 cycles).

Alleviating the issue is the corrosion inhibitor, suitable for aluminum-to-aluminum and aluminum-to-copper connections, applied to the stripped end of the aluminum conductor and to the mating surface of the lug. That prevents humidity to reach the newly exposed surfaces, when Al retreats a bit.
 

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It might be cheaper to cover the stud or joist bay with sheet metal thick enough to meet the requirement for protective plates when cables are to close to the face of the framing members.

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Tom Horne
I like this idea. Thanks for posting this I may end up doing this one day.
 

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Metalic plătesc are required by code at every stud crossing if the distance from cable hole to outside is smaller than 1-1/4".
 

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Metalic plătesc are required by code at every stud crossing if the distance from cable hole to outside is smaller than 1-1/4".
The cable is also required to be supported so that it is 1-1/4" back from the face of the studs. Since the issue in the original post is a vertical run of large cable
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I suggested that the use of sheet metal the same thickness as the "Kick Plates" used to protect horizontal holes might be less expensive than another form of protections such as sheathing the cable in conduit. I was once in the position of needing to run multiple runs of cable from a service panel in the basement up through the shallow wall which was installed over cinder block to contain insulation. The carpenter was long gone so I could not get the wall padded out to the depth needed. I rented a hand planer, set it to the thickness of the required gauge of sheet steel, planed the face of the 2 studs which formed the stud bay I needed to use, sistered both studs on the other side from the protected stud bay so that the sheet rock could still be fastened, installed 3 fixture bars to tie wrap the cables to, installed the cables, and fastened the sheet metal to the planed studs. The electrical inspector was impressed enough to take pictures to use in a class he teaches to apprentices. It was the quickest way to "get er done."

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Tom Horne
 

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That's true about the cable distance.
But with the 2x4 stud being only 3-1/2 wide, deducting (1-1/4)x2=2-1/2 leaves 1" for cable. Sometimes is hard to get it perfect in the middle, hence the need of kick plates.
 
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