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I’m wiring my addition and I noticed electrical tape on the SER cable running up from the basement to the second floor. It was right where the framers cut plywood so I inspected it and I found it was nicked. The cable says 3 AWG CDR 2-1 CDR AWG 4 Compact AL alumaflex.

The cable was feeding a 100amp sub panel in the old garage which is just being replaced with a panel with more space. The addition is 1320 sq ft which consists of 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms. My calculations keep me well under 100amps needed for the space.

Now options to repair the cable. The nick isn’t very deep but i think it’s unsafe. Do you’ll agree? I have enough extra cable length than I can pull the cable down into the basement and splice it into an appropriate size junction box. But then I have to find a place to install the large junction box. What splices are the safest and nec approved?
The other option is to replace the entire cable. I estimate the cable to be roughly 75ft long. It’s basically a straight shot all the way across the 36ft basement. The only pain is removing the clamps holding the cable up.

Either way I’m going to deduct the cost of material from the balance I owe the framing contractor. I’d be less upset if he don’t try to hide it.

What should I do?





 

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Okay, by the look of the nick it is quite obvious that it was a tool/sharp edge that cut through the sheathing of this cable.
This makes it quite obvious to the framer that someone working with them did this and by all rights should be replaced by the framer without question.

If just the sheathing was ripped or town a bit and not any of the insulation of any conductors inside the sheathing or any of the braided ground wire that would be one thing but there is clear indication that the insulation and or braiding was compromised and this says it must be replaced.

What ever way you agree to its repair is fine as long as it is safe. Junction box or straight run either is good as long as done correctly. I would prefer a straight run if the cable is easily access able. Doing this will eliminate any concerns in the future that may come up.

I was on a job site once and the sider's worker cut through the service entrance cable enough to damage it. They had unlatched the clamps that I had holding it to the side of the house and one guy was careless and cut it with a tool. It was not a very deep or big rip/tear but the owner of the siding company immediately called me and told me and said I should replace it at his cost - no questions asked. So the sider spent the money for me to replace the SE cable. That was the right way to do it. The sider took responsibility for his worker's actions and made good on it.

Your framer should do the same without question.
 

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75ft of aluminum will be less expensive than a junction box/connectors, you won't have to find a place for the box, and you won't have the liability of a splice. A splice is a place where a failure can occur vs a continuous cable.

The framer damaged the cable, he should foot the bill to repair the damage to it's original state.
 

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Replace the whole cable, cheaper, less labor, safer on long term.
Splices in Al are possible, and listed connectors can be found, but they are not cheap.
And I don't trust them, Al needs to be retorqued, in time it "gives" and the contact pressure drops. Heating in that area leads to problems, even if NoaLox is used.
 

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Hi, was that cable energized? I would say the framer should buy a lottery ticket, replace the whole cable at his expense.
 

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I'm surprised that there wasn't an arc flash when the cable was cut (would be black charring near the cut). But at any rate, the carpenter is responsible and needs to pay for an electrician to come and replace the entire run of cable. At least the two remnants will be salvageable and reusable on other jobs.
 

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There is no doubt to me that the damage is from a saw. It also looks like the damaged cable has a white stripe. That would explain no arc flash. It is the neutral.
 

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I agree. There's no practical way of fixing this short of replacing the whole thing. Yes, you could put in a box and splice it but that's going to be a pretty substantial wart on the wall that is going to have to remain accessible.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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AL 2224 SER cable is about $1.50 a foot, replace it.
 
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At a minimum, I would splice the cable to remove the damaged area. The photos look like perhaps a few strands of at least the ground were damaged. Use Polaris or the similar Morris connectors.
You don't want a splice hidden in a wall. It would have to be in a box and remain accessible.
 
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You don't want a splice hidden in a wall. It would have to be in a box and remain accessible.
Yes, of course the splice should be made in an appropriate junction box that remains accessible. I didn't mean to suggest otherwise.
 

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Again, you're not going to do that in a 4' box. In fact, unless there's slack there, you're going to need TWO boxes and two sets of splices or an even bigger honking box.
Hmmm... I didn't realize "appropriate" means 4" square. To me, appropriate means having enough volume for the number and size of conductors involved.

Also, if you go back to the OP's post, he said he has enough extra length to pull the cable down into the basement and make the splice. Sounds to me like only one set of connectors would be needed.

I have no objections to replacing the entire cable. I simply said at a minimum, I would splice the cable to remove the damage.
 

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You misunderstand, I'm not saying anybody was intending to use a 4" box, just that it will be larger (and uglier in whatever wall it's mounted in).
 
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