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I'm looking into buying a house that had a defective siding on it. I believe it has inner seal which was the predecessor to smart side. It has damage all the way through the siding in some areas at the bottom. They are probably baseball or softball size damage. It is very easy to pick away at the siding in these areas. Behind the siding is tar paper and wood stud framing. I felt a couple of studs through the paper and they felt solid. Some of the house was done in 4x8 sheets and the rest in plank siding.

I was originally going to just replace the defective boards, until I read that inner seal had major issues and a class action suit. Would you just leave areas that are not damaged? My original plan was to replace the whole south side wall and small areas that were damaged.

Do you think that it is too risky to purchase this house? I will have an inspector come out to do a home inspection, but I don't know if he will be able to determine if there is any framing damage.
 

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Sounds like it may be Masonite siding, which had a huge class-action involving four or five manufacturers. Not sure what you mean by 'inner seal'. The problem with Masonite is that with weathering it becomes permeable to water and begins to delaminate. Masonite is basically a mix of sawdust with waxes and other chemicals, processed with heat and pressure into a board.

Unusual for a home to have no sheathing at all, only tar paper, as far as I know.

If Masonite was painted well initially and regularly, it might still be in decent condition, especially if protected by deep eaves. With no eaves, and only the initial sloppy watered-down paint job, by now it's falling apart like wet cardboard, especially close to the ground.

Pictures will help.
 

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Unless you are getting a really good deal on this house and the seller is offering to pay for the damage, not worth spending your own money on, unless you plan on doing a bunch of changes after you get it in your possession.

Cheap Vinyl drys out after a while, because the oil gets sucked out of the plastic and in turn becomes brittle. Especially during Winter time.

Good Quality Vinyl will flex for a long time and should show no damage if something hits it.

The only way to know if there is any moisture intrusion, is to hire your own person with the equipment to check moisture content and a FLIR to look behind the walls and ceiling.
 

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It's not Masonite, nor is it vinyl.


It's actually OSB with a wax impregnated paper covering, sold by Louisiana Pacific.

Worse than Masonite, but has some similarities in that it will absorb moisture and swell on the edges.


I doubt the underlying structure has suffered any damage, but can say for certain, that this stuff needs to come off the house and be replaced with a better product.
 
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