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A "Handy Husband"
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Absolutely, that is all I ever use.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
 
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Yes, the existing #18 internal fluorescent light wiring (if it’s in good shape) is rated for 600V. (Kind of a pain to find actually). Feel free to use it for 120V interconnects on direct-wire LEDs.

If the old ballast is defective, snip the wires off directly at the ballast.

If it’s a heavy, bulky, buzzy old magnetic ballast that feels like it contains a lot of copper and iron, same thing - world doesn’t need any more of those. Craigslist is glutted with people trying to get money for ratty old mag ballasts.

Modern electronic ballasts are valuable - try to leave the next guy 12” on each wire. Put em on Freecycle, Craigslist or eBay especially if you have a stack of them. Most of my supply came from LED conversions.

Should you trash the old ballasts? The instructions say leave the ballast bolted in, for precisely one reason: the older ballasts have PCBs in them, and you really don’t want that in your landfill/groundwater. However newer ballasts (1990 and newer) do not, and most ballasts in the transition period are labeled “No PCB” if that’s true.

Don’t trash the ballast if it’s physically blocking holes that you don’t want to cover with a piece of metal or a knockout plug.

Don’t trash the ballast if it has PCBs. Talk to your household hazardous waste people in your county.

Don’t leave a PCB ballast in a fixture. Otherwise it’ll end up in the landfill *anyway* when the fixture is trashed later. Nobody checks old LED fixtures for PCB ballasts! Since you caught it now, dispose of it properly now. And good riddance!

You can give old non-PCB ballasts to your junkyard-dog buddy who hacks copper out of old appliances, but only if you don’t like him too much. He’d be fighting through a lot of tar and iron to get to a little copper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well that was a no go, the tumbstones (non-shunted) I bought would not fit into my fixture. My fixture has setup for lamp holders that clip in and I can not find any that will work. So its back to the drawing board
 

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Well that was a no go, the tumbstones (non-shunted) I bought would not fit into my fixture. My fixture has setup for lamp holders that clip in and I can not find any that will work. So its back to the drawing board
Welcome to LED conversions. The Chinese make the tubes single-ended to save less than a penny. They talk about slavery, but who’s the slave here?

Yeah, there isn’t *one kind* of tombstone. You’ll have to hit 1000bulbs.com and some of the better fluorescent sites and see if they sell tombstones that’ll fit.

But I’d much rather you take the LEDs back because every store that sells single-ended LEDs deserves to lose money... and go one of two ways:

- Get double-ended LEDs. “Universal” types (that run with or without ballast) should be double-ended by nature. (The small current on the 2 pins is for a tiny preheat filament, and can’t run an LED light).

- Go modern real fluorescent, which if you have it, LED makes no sense. it’s zero flicker, zero hum, works cold, and the light is 90 CRI and better than LED. Go electronic ballast if it isn’t already (deletes flicker hum cold), then get 90 CRI tubes that match (light quality). Lean toward F32T8 tubes instead of obsolete F40T12, and you want an “instant-start” ballast to match your wiring.
What's wrong with ones that were there before?
“Cheap LED builders going single-ended” vs shunted tombstones has plagued LED conversions since day 1.

I got a huge batch of new-pull ballasts where both red wires have a shunted tombstone on the end of them. That poor builder had to convert every fixture, I can only imagine the money he lost on that job. SMH.
 
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