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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I have a building floor plan that I am trying to understand


The plan has a series of numbers on the left and right, and I understand these can be used to decipher the dimensions of the various rooms. However, I need to be able to figure out how to interpret these numbers. All I know is that the plan is drawn to a scale of 1:100


I have attached a section of the plan here. Would any of you be able to help me or point to a resource that can help me figure out the various dimensions of the rooms, floors, etc.



Thanks - Oyi
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Please post a higher resolution image.

Chris

Thanks - please see below for a new jpg file.



I also uploaded close up versions of the porch and bathrooms.



Please, let me know if you are able to see it clearly.


cheers, Oy
 

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· Hammered Thumb
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A little backwards from what is typically done in the states, but other countries drive on the wrong side of road though :biggrin2:



Line X: You have a grid like what you would set up for a steel framed building. So you could say there is a column at A-14, or a column line along A-14, so you don't have to dimension each and every column. If there is no steel then looks like centerlines of walls. This starts from the perimeter, like the edge of a foundation. So first 75mm, then 4950, 2250.


Line Y: These are the dimensions of the out-to-out walls (but referenced back to Line X). So 150, 4800,150,2100,150. You'd have to do some math to build the walls.



Line Z: These are the openings in the walls. You'd have to do even more math to build these openings. So 1278,4797,1676.
 

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Again .. so to get the width of the porch, do you add all the values along Line X or Y or Z?
You could use X or Y. So using X the porch width would be [75+4950+2250+2400 = 9675 units]. Units equating to mm, cm, inches, feet or anything else does not make sense.

Unless my mind is not functioning, there is something amiss here, if it was really drawn at 1:100 the entire drawing would fit on an index card or McDonald's napkin. I think it was drawn at a different scale, like English units, then Metric was wrongly applied.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, the drawings were done in an English speaking country ... in West Africa. and I understand it is in metric (mm). So we need to resolve the issue of scale.


cheers, Oy







You could use X or Y. So using X the porch width would be [75+4950+2250+2400 = 9675 units]. Units equating to mm, cm, inches, feet or anything else does not make sense.

Unless my mind is not functioning, there is something amiss here, if it was really drawn at 1:100 the entire drawing would fit on an index card or McDonald's napkin. I think it was drawn at a different scale, like English units, then Metric was wrongly applied.
 

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Yes, the drawings were done in an English speaking country ... in West Africa. and I understand it is in metric (mm). So we need to resolve the issue of scale.
It is all drawn to scale, in that each entity is in the same relationship in comparison to each other, but what each unit is representing (via any English or Metric measurement) is not clear for you to build it.

This mistake happens a lot when creating (really talking about printing) construction documents - like when you import/set up a paper size for a drawing you have to scale it properly to fit your CAD program's dimensioning suite (or vice versa). What seems to me, checking a couple typical sizes, is it was 'printed' at 1/4"=1'-0" without dimensions, then scaled 50%, then dimensioned at 1:50 engineering scale.

So when it says build the porch 9675 units long, I don't know what that physically means. If you have a real large enough print on say 18x24 paper, make your own scale based on a known entity in the drawing. Like a 4' opening, or 8" CMU wall thickness.
 

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If you know for sure any single large dimension (such as the porch length) then keep printing it at various scales until the porch measures that dimension, using an architects scale. I have done this before. Get it to work at 1/8" = 1' or 3/16" = 1' or whatever is convenient for you. Then you can just use the architects scale to measure every dimension on the drawing that is important to you, and mark up the drawing with English measurements.
 
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If you know for sure any single large dimension (such as the porch length) then keep printing it at various scales until the porch measures that dimension, using an architects scale. I have done this before. Get it to work at 1/8" = 1' or 3/16" = 1' or whatever is convenient for you. Then you can just use the architects scale to measure every dimension on the drawing that is important to you, and mark up the drawing with English measurements.
we did a house with metric plans. We just bought metric tape measures and it did not slow us down much to change the thinking.
 

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The OP has written that the plans are for a country in Africa, so the measurements are going to be metric. It would be unusual if the units used were not millimeters. To convert things for what most of us on this forum are used to, the one overall measurement that we can read is “23015” or 23 meters for the distance from the “A” marker to the “L” marker along the bottom. If we take the three rooms at the top right and move them to the bottom right we can see that the indoor area of this residence would approximately fit into a square 23m X 23m. That converts to about 6000 square feet.

As 3onthetree mentioned, some of the dimensions seem odd to us in North America, but lifestyles are different elsewhere in the world and we don’t know what the owner has asked to go into the “WC” room that requires it to be (for us) unusually large.

To the OP, printing out a plan at varying zoom levels then taping paper together to get a scaled plan can be a challenge. You don’t really need to do that, since almost every dimension is specified for you. Some of the window widths are not defined, but you can calculate those using scaling from whatever printout that you have, or even from your computer screen. For example, the width of the door opening to the porch from the living room is 5.3 mm on my screen and the width of the room is 8.1 mm. We know that the width of the room is 4950 +2250 = 7200 mm from the drawing, so the width of the door opening is (7200/8.1)5.3 = 4711 mm.

Chris
 

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They could be in millimeters, my intial comparison was looking at the size of tub drawn in the bathroom, and the size of toilet drawn in the WC room, to think the sizes of rooms were overinflated, but mostly when you apply 1:100 it doesn't make sense.

To explain more fully a DIY scale, pick a known distance, like the double door to the entry. If that door opening is 4'-0" wide, line up a piece of paper along it and transfer two pencil marks along the edge of paper. Then on the edge of paper use those first marks' proportions to make 8', then 12', then 16'. Split it in half to make 2', then 1', then 6". You will have a DIY scale no matter what the drawing is printed at.

The OP never said if she needs English or Metric equivalents.
 
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