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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My husband and I are remodeling an old home. We removed several layers of rotted out subflooring in the kitchen only to find the floor joists are questionable. They are 2x6s spaced 18" apart. We planned on plywood, backer board, and tile but after seeing this we don't think it can support all that weight. So at this point - where do we go? Remove all the joists? Sister the joists? So frustrated. The tile is going to be running throughout the house except the bedrooms but we hadn't planned on removing the subflooring anywhere except this kitchen.
 

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Civil Engineer
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I don't really understand what you are asking. Without photos,no one can help you decide if the joists can be salvaged. I think you understand the options, you can replace the damaged joists, sister in joists to strengthen the existing damaged joists, or possibly use get rot or similar epoxy type liquids to minimize future rot (this will not strengthen the joists, just stop further rot). You also need to determine the cause of the water damage, and correct the problem. What solution you select will be determined by the condition of the joists, the ease of replacement, and the strength you need to support the tile you have selected.
 

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I would assume the OP is more worried about the size and the weight they are about to add. If you look at the span charts, a 2x6 can span about 9' depending on the species of lumber. Sounds like if you want to add a subfloor, backer and tile, you may need to beef them up.
Do you have easy access to the joists and does the plumbing and electrical run through the joists? If so, it will make the job a lot more difficult
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
having trouble adding the photos. I have added them to my album if you can check there.

ZTMAN you are correct. I am mainly concerned about weight. There does not appear to be plumbing and electrical running through the joists. I have easy access to this area where the subfloor has been torn up but the livingroom, hallway, and bathroom are intact.

Daniel Holzman the plumbing issue was resolved so no danger of water leaking anymore and the joists themselves are in good shape. Only the layers of plywood were rotted and ruined.
 

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Tileguy
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Damaged joists........what damaged joists? The OP doesn't have damaged joists.

A. Garcia, I imagine you've already talked to someone about the small joists, can you tell us what the unsupported span is? Did you measure the joists' spacing on center or from beginning to end? Do you know the species and grade? What is their actual measurement, width and height? What type of subfloor and thickness, plans for a second layer? Basement underneath or crawl space? I'l assume the rest of the house is built the same way.

I'm a few minutes late, but please answer what you can.

Jaz
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
JazMan haven't specifically talked to anyone other than my husband and we have differing opinions. But not being experts we thought we'd see what everyone else thinks.
Measured the joist spacing from center. The beams are spanning 10' to a cross beam made up of a 4x6 plus a 2x6 all together (equaling 6x6). I'm not sure about the type of wood. Possibly just pine - it does have knots.
Crawlspace underneath. Posted a few photos in my album if you can check there.
Thanks!
 

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Tileguy
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I'll take your word for it, but that unsupported span doesn't look like 120" from here. How about that single joist that is under the joists? How are the joists connected to the beam in #1? Doesn't look right to me. Are they just toe-nailed? Are those concrete blocks under that have been moved? The house is located where? You forgot to enter a location, might matter.

What's the measurement from the point of the joist below the joists to the block wall? That's the unsupported span, not the entire length.

Just for clarity, the 2x6 running north & south in #1 are the joists, not beams. The beam is the set closest to the camera running east & west.

Jaz
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
correct about the beam and joist description.
the concrete blocks have not been moved.
It appears the kitchen was extended from its original floorplan and the laundry room (green room) added also on the side of the kitchen.
From the photos you can't see the entire length but it is 10'. My husband is there now but cell service is poor so he can only upload photos periodically when he can get to a wifi connection.
 

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That certainly looks like 'old growth' timber and to some degree is far better wood than the stuff the moderns tables are rating. How much, I can't guess but I've seen some amazing things over the years.

The addition of piers and or piers and beams at the center point can make that floor sturdy safe even with the undersized joists. The rest of the house is another project
 
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