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Hi,

I have to reinforce a few floor joists that are "moderately" water damaged on the 2nd floor of a 100 y/o brick row house. The house was a rental for 20 odd years prior, and we knew there had been plumbing/radiator leaks, but only after I removed the old floors did we realize that it damaged the joists. They are fairly solid still, but definitely damaged, and we will be adding tile floors and a cast iron clawfoot tub (4', I guess 2-300 lbs), so we want to minimize deflection and reinforce for added weight. I will sister some of them to reinforce (plywood, screwed and glued), but a couple are pretty bad, and also have large notches (about 3.5' x 3.5", maybe 10" from the pocket) cut in the top for the (original) waste water lines. An engineer advised to add a joist adjacent to the worst 2 joists which I think is a good solution - especially for one joist which is warped from the water damage. My question is, what type of joist hanger can I use? The main considerations are the brick being close to 100 y/o, so can't do a lot of drilling into them (1 hole, screw/anchor per brick), and preferring not to add a lintel as that would mean we would have to lower the kitchen ceiling below adding time and cost when we do that reno later. I was looking at some Simpson hangers, and was thinking this might be an option: http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/MBHU_Masonry.asp, but I am a bit concerned about drilling a 3/4" hole, 5" into the wall for the supplied anchor bolts which will go through the first row of bricks, I believe. If anyone has any experience or suggestions for either adding joists, or otherwise resolving, I would appreciate! I was thinking of attaching that hanger with anchors like this: http://www.simpsonanchors.com/catalog/mechanical/wedge-all/index.html (it doesn't say brick, but it does say it's for "grout-filled masonry"), or tapcon screws. Another idea is to get some steel plates fabricated with pockets and long enough to go on the face of say, 4 rows of brick (vertically). So you know, 1 wall is an exterior wall, and the other side is a party wall shared by 2 houses. Also, we are planning to put in underfloor radiant heat using Pex tubing, but I don't think that will be a factor in how we attach.
 

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Why can't you cut pockets in the brick and have the joists sit in the wall?
 
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