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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I am building a skylight shaft (22x22 roof opening and 24x30 ceiling opening). Would floating corners be the way to go since the shaft tying the roof and the ceiling causing different types of movement? Thanks.
 

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Naildriver
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See also http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/strongbacks-ceiling-joists-536401/

Have you considered a solar tube rather than a skylight? Easier to install, no appreciable weight on the structure and the light is like fluorescent light on the work area. IMO, skylights are holes in otherwise non leaking roofs with a propensity to leak in time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
See also http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/strongbacks-ceiling-joists-536401/

Have you considered a solar tube rather than a skylight? Easier to install, no appreciable weight on the structure and the light is like fluorescent light on the work area. IMO, skylights are holes in otherwise non leaking roofs with a propensity to leak in time.
Yes, I've looked at solar tubes. The issue with them is that they need to be in direct sunlight and my 4:12 roof faces North West. I've read reviews showing the solar tubes gave inadequate amount of light on cloudy winter days that the owners wanted to replace them with conventional skylights for better natural light.

The manufacturer (Velux) gives a 10-year no-leak guarantee provided that the skylight is installed using their flashing kit (mine is). I've read the flashing procedure for solar tubes and it appeared not much waterproofing than that for skylights. Both require roof openings but they are not much different from others like vents, chimneys etc.

Having said that, I might put a solar tube above a dark hallway as the kids always find it a bit too gloomy there. :surprise:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Not sure what a floating corner s but if you want strength you want everything built as one
So you don;t get drywall cracks or air leaks to the attic.
Floating corners is a method avoiding fastening drywalls to corner studs/plates by following this specification

The reasoning is to allow drywalls to flex under movement/stress caused by moisture shrinkage/expansion and truss lift phenomenon. The aim is to eliminate cracks. It has been in practice for over 20 plus years.
 

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retired framer
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Yes for where the trusses meet the wall. If it the same house as you skylight you have rafters so no problem or need to worry about that.. And if you are talking about the skylight corners lock that all up tight and plywood behind drywall really does that.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes for where the trusses meet the wall. If it the same house as you skylight you have rafters so no problem or need to worry about that.. And if you are talking about the skylight corners lock that all up tight and plywood behind drywall really does that.
Yes, same house and yes, skylight shaft corners. That's the original plan - the shaft is wrapped by plywood exposed to unconditioned attic air, insulated with faced R-19 fiberglass and covered up with 1/2" drywall.
 

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retired framer
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Yes, same house and yes, skylight shaft corners. That's the original plan - the shaft is wrapped by plywood exposed to unconditioned attic air, insulated with faced R-19 fiberglass and covered up with 1/2" drywall.
Where I am paper faced insulation is history we do everything with 6 mill poly taped and sealed.
Just to be clear the plywood would go under the drywall and let the back side be open with insulation showing or covered with house wrap or something that will hold it in place and let it breath.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Where I am paper faced insulation is history we do everything with 6 mill poly taped and sealed.
Just to be clear the plywood would go under the drywall and let the back side be open with insulation showing or covered with house wrap or something that will hold it in place and let it breath.
That's interesting. While my city building code doesn't require a rigid backing to prevent settlement of soft/fluffy insulation materials, this inspection site does.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Where I am paper faced insulation is history we do everything with 6 mill poly taped and sealed.
Just to be clear the plywood would go under the drywall and let the back side be open with insulation showing or covered with house wrap or something that will hold it in place and let it breath.
It's that I happen to have a big roll of R-19 above the garage joists saved from a wall-repairing job years ago. I've read that some people tear off the paper to achieve better contact?
 
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