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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We moved into a house (first time owners) with a new roof a couple of years back. A few things we are noticing and not sure if this is a problem. Any help would be greatly appreciated! The replacement was done before we moved in so no idea who did it.

1. The angle / sloping of the roof is not correct in all places. As a result all the water doesn't drain through the downspout and tends to collect in a couple of spots. Should anything be done about this and if so what could I do by myself? I don't have any tools but could work out something

2. Due to overhead pine trees the downspouts often get clogged with leaves, cones and other debris and blocks the water flow. Was looking at having those guards but read mixed reviews. Is there any other solution?

3. Related to 2 above; during moderate - heavy rains (which is the norm sort of in Seattle) all the excess water tends to overflow from all the edges of the roof and onto the ground below. Should we look at replacing downspouts with gutters and install gutter guards?

4. The roof had a top paint of white but in a lot of places that has come off and the underlying black is seen. Should I look at repainting with the white thingie?

Sorry for the long list! Appreciate any feedback / suggestions you may have. Thanks!
 

· retired framer
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Any slope that should be there would have had to be done by the original framer and if the frame work is built out of real lumber, it really is a crap shoot. All lumber has a slight bend to it, we call that the crown and we always put the crown up. So on a flat roof it would have a hump in the middle. Lumber can be wet or some percentage of wetness when we build and it will continue to dry until it matches the house that it is in and sometimes that drying also includes some changing of shape. That will leave you with some humps bumps and hollows in a flat surface. You are not likely going to do anything to fix it and it might change with seasons.
We have the same problems with floors but we do much more to keep it flat when we build a floor.
 

· retired framer
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Thanks Neal! I hear tales of seepage or roof collapsing due to roof having water on it. Is that really a concern? In which case I would need to do something for the sloping?

The roof should be engineered for a lot more weight than any amount of water sitting up there.
 

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your roof will fail faster if there's water pooling everywhere.

I've seen a method where they use mortar to create a slope and then coat the mortar. It's probably some reinforced mortar.

there are gutters that can go around those downspouts




if there's already a white silicone coating on top of the old roof, it doesn't sound like a new roof was put on. especially if it's peeling already and bonded poorly.

that white silicone coating needs regular maintenance every few years.

I'm guessing the previous owners had leaks, and this was white silicone was the cheapest bandaid.
 

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no. you don't have to redo the silicone until it starts to fail.
for the peeling areas, you can wire brush carefully and pressure wash, and recoat that area.



this is the modified portland cement product for fixing slope issues.

it probably won't bond properly the silicone, so you might need to wire brush and remove as much silicone from the ponding areas
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks pman! Got a chance to go to the roof and take some snaps of the water pooling at the length of the roof. The gutter is at one end and it looks like the roof slopes at the middle causing a water pooling. You can also see the white layer gone and the underlying black seen.
 

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These pictures hint that your roof needs attention.
I'd rip the flat roof off when no rain is forecast down to the joists.
Then have a framer add joists to create a slope to address the water pooling. Install a plywood deck, apply tar paper and re-roof with torch down roofing material.
To improve the pine needles and cones: trip the tree frequently and install leaf protection on your gutter.
Costly? might be, but it will solve your problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
These pictures hint that your roof needs attention.
I'd rip the flat roof off when no rain is forecast down to the joists.
Then have a framer add joists to create a slope to address the water pooling. Install a plywood deck, apply tar paper and re-roof with torch down roofing material.
To improve the pine needles and cones: trip the tree frequently and install leaf protection on your gutter.
Costly? might be, but it will solve your problems.
Thanks and yikes! It feels such a rip off that this roof was done not 3 yrs ago and now I may have to do it again. Would this be like a $5K estimate or less? Any chance home insurance covers this? ;)
 
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