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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I've spent long days trying to remove wallpaper in my bathroom. The house was built in the late seventies.

There were two layers and the first was not nearly as difficult as the second layer. The second layer looked to be the original wall paper from when the house was first built. It literally looked like regular paper stuck on the wall and was extremely porous. It was a big pain to remove that layer.
Anyways, while I was removing the second layer of wallpaper... it seemed to be that the "drywall" was just a cardboard layer with joint compound over area with nails. I've uploaded a few photos to better explain the situation.

During the wallpaper removal, a lot of the compound and cardboard wall was damaged. I was going to paint some walls and wallpaper other walls as part if the renovation, but I am unsure how to go about this with this type of wall.

Are there any suggestions to fixing the problem so that I can successfully paint and wallpaper the wall? Also, what actually is this wall since it does not look like typical drywall...
Any help is appreciated! Thanks
 

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Got a real mess there.
Things that will always cause on going issues in a bathroom.
A window.
Wallpaper.
Anything other then moisture resistant drywall. (green board, Denshield, paperless drywall)
And you have it all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:(Do you have any suggestions for moving this project along?
I've decided to stop until I know what to do next.
thanks
 

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http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/drywall-wallpaper-removal-152045/

Lots of topics on this very subject. If you use the search function type in "Guardz primer" or "drywall repair" or even "wallpaper removal" and you will find reams of information.

In a nutshell, remove any bits of damaged drywall by light sanding. Once you have it relatively smooth, prime those damaged spots with Guardz primer to seal up the damage. Allow to dry. Apply joint compound to those damaged spots with a 4 - 6" broad knife. Apply 2 or 3 coats feathering it out with each successive coat to make the repair "flush." When dry, lightly sand again being sure to make the spots flush with the existing drywall. Wipe off excess dust, prime with a drywall primer and you're ready for paint.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When I removed the wallpaper there was absolutely no drywall underneath the wallpaper...so I'm thinking someone cut huge corners!:glare:

I have basically taken down all of the wallpaper reveal the bare walls.

Thanks for the advice! I'll research the product.

Do you know what sort of wall prep would be needed for areas that would be wallpapered?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/drywall-wallpaper-removal-152045/

Lots of topics on this very subject. If you use the search function type in "Guardz primer" or "drywall repair" or even "wallpaper removal" and you will find reams of information.

In a nutshell, remove any bits of damaged drywall by light sanding. Once you have it relatively smooth, prime those damaged spots with Guardz primer to seal up the damage. Allow to dry. Apply joint compound to those damaged spots with a 4 - 6" broad knife. Apply 2 or 3 coats feathering it out with each successive coat to make the repair "flush." When dry, lightly sand again being sure to make the spots flush with the existing drywall. Wipe off excess dust, prime with a drywall primer and you're ready for paint.
I am unable to find Guardz where I live. Do you have any recommendations for alternatives?
 

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I did a paper removal a few years back on a house of similar age. I came across the same brown "drywall", and mine was hung in 4 x 4 sections, not the typical 4 x 8 of sheetrock. I inquired about it from some pros and was told it was gyprock, the early form of sheetrock. I hadn't seen it before then and haven't seen it since. I just treated it like any other sheetrock, and Gymschu addressed that.
I would put a coat of oil sealer somewhere in the mix of steps, even on the areas to be papered. All that browning makes me nervous.
 

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I'm very fond of Gardz for sheetrock repair - but i'm going to have to agree with JS on this one and say oil. Thin down Cover stain a bit ( to penetrate the damage) and apply to seal and hold back the stains. Gardz will not do that.

Then patch as Gym says.

If you really didn't want to use oil- a little less foolproof but may work is to hit the damage with gardz ( comes in qts) and then prime all with a waterborne alkyd called Smart Prime (or sold in HD and other boxes as Zinnser 123 plus- make sure its the plus). Then follow Gyms procedure.
Will have less fumes. You will know if browning comes through (Not just covering problem, but literally comes through) the white primer that you have a water soluble bleed. Sometimes a second coat of the 123+ ( after an overnight dry) will lock it in and get it.

Good luck!
 

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One thing to remember Cover stain is oil based so to thin it you must use mineral spirits or penatrol, not water.
 

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One thing to remember Cover stain is oil based so to thin it you must use mineral spirits or penatrol, not water.
I would sand the surface to remove loose material,clean up the dust,paper etc. and prime with an oil based sealer such as BIN or Coverstain( I'm almost positive a water based is not going to block it) Then patch your walls with joint compound until smooth(may take going over the bad spots 3 times)Sand,then prime your patched areas.Now you are ready for paint or sizing if you are going to re-paper.
 

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Over here on the DIY- you need to be very clear....
Yea brush sometimes we forget the little things because we do it so much we don't think about it. But for someone doing it for the first time it can be confusing. That's why I think we should kinda look over each others shoulder, not to show we're smarter or better.
 

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I agree Brush and Tool....I haven't been on either of these forums very long....been painting over 25 yrs but I am a rookie at this stuff.
Charlie D.
 

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I would sand the surface to remove loose material,clean up the dust,paper etc. and prime with an oil based sealer such as BIN or Coverstain( I'm almost positive a water based is not going to block it) Then patch your walls with joint compound until smooth(may take going over the bad spots 3 times)Sand,then prime your patched areas.Now you are ready for paint or sizing if you are going to re-paper.

Wall covering PRIMER is what is needed, sizing is an antiquated term
 
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