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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First time (clueless) homeowner here. We had a bad storm a few weeks ago. I've just noticed that one of our trees outside our fence line is bent over, almost completely lying on the ground. Can anyone diagnose the problem? Have any recommendations for fixing? Is this something I can fix on my own or should I have a professional come out to do it?

Thank you!
PH
659157


659158
 

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retired framer
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Good luck!!
I can not open pictures.
 

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it looks like most of the roots might be on top of the weed-guard material.
from a personal observation, since the root system appears to be so shallow, the canopy is over crowding that area and should be replanted somewhere else with more room. (what kind of plant is it ??). what part of the world are you in ? can you get a photo from way further back ??
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the quick responses, y'all!

Fix'n it: on which side are we removing the dirt? The side where it fell?

Nealtw: the fabric is some sort of material under the mulch. The roots were cut through the fabric and took hold, so I think the tree was planted.

For all: would it be OK to dig around all of the roots so that I can place the tree more securely in the hole, and then replace the dirt around?

Thanks!
 

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Thanks for the quick responses, y'all!

Fix'n it: on which side are we removing the dirt? The side where it fell?

Nealtw: the fabric is some sort of material under the mulch. The roots were cut through the fabric and took hold, so I think the tree was planted.

For all: would it be OK to dig around all of the roots so that I can place the tree more securely in the hole, and then replace the dirt around?

Thanks!
Remove the mulch, remove the fabric. dig out on the fence side do the ball and drop back down.
Stand it up. Tie it to the fence. pack the dirt back around it and water it.
 

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That's more of a shrub than a tree and Neal's suggestion should work, although I think John is correct that the plant is out-growing the area where it's located. Reducing the number of vertical branches may help.

While you have it out of the hole, make sure that none of the roots are growing in a circle around the root ball. If they are snip them with pruning shears to encourage outward growth.
 

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I'm not for sure, but that looks like a hybrid willow tree. I'm in the foot hills of the Adirondack mountains in upstate NY and we have lots of those here.

They grow well just about anywhere, like a weed. No special care or soil needed. I've broken off branches and stuck them in the ground and they grow. Crazy tree. They will take over a landscape/area very quickly if you don't keep them trimmed. Just saying.

Any of the suggestions mentioned above should work.
 

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@Prof. Homeowner nice to meet you! And welcome!

Where are you? City/county and state or province are enough. That will help a lot in giving advice.

Please provide close ups of the leaves, flowers etc so we can figure out what your tipsy plant is. That could be important because a fast growing plant might be better pruned as well as tied back into place. Location also helps advice based on seasons. Good advice in Minneapolis might not be so good in Miami.
 

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Too much/frequent watering and any plant's roots will not go very deep into the ground. That's because the water is at the surface and there's not need for the plant to send a root deeper. The result is shallow roots and no stability.

We see it all the time in our subdivision where they water WaaaaaaaYYYY too much. When we wanted to remove some foundation bushes (in the ground for ten years) we simply grabbed the base, rocked them back-and-forth and pulled up - the roots ran under the mulch, not deep into the ground. Same with trees in the area - wind blows them over.
 

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Too much/frequent watering and any plant's roots will not go very deep into the ground. That's because the water is at the surface and there's not need for the plant to send a root deeper. The result is shallow roots and no stability.

We see it all the time in our subdivision where they water WaaaaaaaYYYY too much. When we wanted to remove some foundation bushes (in the ground for ten years) we simply grabbed the base, rocked them back-and-forth and pulled up - the roots ran under the mulch, not deep into the ground. Same with trees in the area - wind blows them over.
We had a maple that had to be removed for the same reason. Our front yard gets so wet I had to put a surface drain in about 3 ft from that tree.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That's more of a shrub than a tree and Neal's suggestion should work, although I think John is correct that the plant is out-growing the area where it's located. Reducing the number of vertical branches may help.

While you have it out of the hole, make sure that none of the roots are growing in a circle around the root ball. If they are snip them with pruning shears to encourage outward growth.
Jim_bee: Yes, I think you're right that the plant is out-growing the area. I managed to prop it back up, and some of the branches are pushing against the fence now. I plan to cut some of those off today. Would an electric hedge trimmer do the job?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'm not for sure, but that looks like a hybrid willow tree. I'm in the foot hills of the Adirondack mountains in upstate NY and we have lots of those here.

They grow well just about anywhere, like a weed. No special care or soil needed. I've broken off branches and stuck them in the ground and they grow. Crazy tree. They will take over a landscape/area very quickly if you don't keep them trimmed. Just saying.

Any of the suggestions mentioned above should work.
@Prof. Homeowner nice to meet you! And welcome!

Where are you? City/county and state or province are enough. That will help a lot in giving advice.

Please provide close ups of the leaves, flowers etc so we can figure out what your tipsy plant is. That could be important because a fast growing plant might be better pruned as well as tied back into place. Location also helps advice based on seasons. Good advice in Minneapolis might not be so good in Miami.
jmon is on the right track. We're in the southern tier of New York State, in Olean, NY.
 

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I had a purple leaf plum in my front yard. Several times the wind blew it half way over. I dug out on the opposite side of the lean, pulled it back up a little beyond vertical with a ratchet strap attached to the back of my riding mower, drove a stake about 10 feel out and tied it. Packed the dirt back in. I left it staked for two years and figured that should do it. Removed the stake and the very next storm, it blew over again. I took it out and replaced it with another just like it and it's never moved. I assume when the first one was planted they didn't dig a big enough hole and with the ground being clay type soil, it couldn't root out. That's been 3 or 4 years and I haven't had a problem yet.
 

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jmon is on the right track. We're in the southern tier of New York State, in Olean, NY.
You may want to annihilate that willow, especially if there's drains anywhere nearby.

They have the most aggressive roots of any trees I've seen, except maybe Ficus. On the other hand, I can understand their appeal. Is this one of those "pussy willows"? They are tough and hardy, and if you strap it down, it should re-root, yea verily, with a vengeance.

I'm in California now, but I'm from Cleveland, and its climate is much like yours, except, mercifully, not as cold in the winter.
 

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I plan to cut some of those off today. Would an electric hedge trimmer do the job?
Fix'n it posted the right tool for this job. Loppers will do better for the larger diameter branches. Pruning shears would handle the small stuff. If you do much landscape gardening, you will appreciate having both.

If you decide that the current site isn't the right one for that plant, you should be able to move it without hurting it. Best time for planting and transplanting trees and shrubs is in the fall. Just pick another plant to put in it's place.

Finding that a plant doesn't work well in a particular place is just part of gardening. I've got some hibiscus that are going to have be moved this fall after finding out this summer that the size estimates from the grower are way off and they are just too big for the current location.
 
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