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In spite of the fact that it should be replaced, it can be repaired (at least, temporarily - to make it watertight) by using an appropriate "Epoxy Putty" - largely, on the inside.
(Here is just one example of such a product - Loctite All Purpose 2 oz. Epoxy Putty-1999131 - The Home Depot )

This product "mixes" like modeling clay.
Clean the "crack" and the inside of the box, . . . remove the "Duct" tape.
I agree totally. Look the only factor in this is that it can leak water into an already underground rated cable. Keep it simple and use this EPOXY. I have used this before and it is like hand-forming a ROCK. Two weeks ago I used it to attach a steel handle insert (sees very high temps) to a wood handle cover. Works like a champ and handles very high heat. All you care is that it locks out the water and re-forms the LB. Listen to instructions offered by FrodoOne, just do it and call 'er good!
 

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See if I can post a picture here.

View attachment 674457 View attachment 674458 I put this box up each fall just to keep my outside water tap from becoming rusty then need replacement.
I have no shut off for it inside the basement.
So, was hoping to prolong the life of the tap through the winter months.
Seems to be working well going on 10 or so years now.
It is strange to imagine that an "outside water tap" might become "rusty", since (in my experience) all such (outside or inside) water taps are made of Brass!
 

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I agree totally. Look the only factor in this is that it can leak water into an already underground rated cable. Keep it simple and use this EPOXY. I have used this before and it is like hand-forming a ROCK. Two weeks ago I used it to attach a steel handle insert (sees very high temps) to a wood handle cover. Works like a champ and handles very high heat. All you care is that it locks out the water and re-forms the LB. Listen to instructions offered by FrodoOne, just do it and call 'er good!
I most sincerely thank you for your "support"!
Epoxy Resins (in many forms) are quite amazing products for effecting many repairs.
(This is partly because (as I posted at #14) "manufacturers tend to use the least amount of material that they can "get-away" with.")
 

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I most sincerely thank you for your "support"!
Epoxy Resins (in many forms) are quite amazing products for effecting many repairs.
(This is partly because (as I posted at #14) "manufacturers tend to use the least amount of material that they can "get-away" with.")
YES! I am a mechanical engineer and I am always cussing other engineers who seem to always use too many sizes of screw or bolt sizes on machines and, like you so aptly point out(!), not enough material around prime areas that are most likely to break-- protruding pieces and sharp corners where stress concentration will occur.
Here is the other thing: Everyone has their favorite tool-- a farmer may find a way to use a 3# sledge to bend out a pulley lip but fine furniture wood worker may use a tiny ball peen and tap on it for a half hour! If you ask an electrician how to fix an LB he WILL come up with a way YOU would never have thought of to repair-- as a number of them have here. They are all good, regulation abiding, fixes that will impress any electrical inspector. THAT, however, does not mean they are the BEST and most efficient fixes that will still work but take a fraction of the time. . . and will still pass inspection(regardless of how they may "Look"!) One has to sort the solutions for the ONE that works. . . for that application! Glad to offer support. . . probably more than you wanted. . . I can go . . . ON!
 

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Remember that epoxy is vulnerable to UV light. Wait until it fully cures (give it a month) then scuff-sand it a tiny bit with a Scotchbrite pad, then prime it with an oil based primer (Rustoleum or Kilz Original)... then paint it.
 

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Remember that epoxy is vulnerable to UV light. Wait until it fully cures (give it a month) then scuff-sand it a tiny bit with a Scotchbrite pad, then prime it with an oil based primer (Rustoleum or Kilz Original)... then paint it.
While that is true of clear Epoxy Resin (often used with Fiber Glass reinforcement) in an exterior situation, it is hardly necessary with (non-transparent) Epoxy Putty, especially when used as a "Plaster Cast" on the inside of a "box".
Of course, any exposed "putty" needs to be painted to match any existing coating - as in this example. (Post #1)

For UV protection, I have found that two coats of a matching exterior acrylic paint to be quite satisfactory.
 

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The actual connection to UF (gray cable) is made somewhere behind a finished wall in the basement,
This is a code violation, for good reason.

One possible solution is to cut a square hole in the finished wall to install an "old work" box, do the splice inside it, and install a cover to make it look nice.
 
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