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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The conduit body feeding outdoor post light in my new house is cracked, see picture below. The cable inside the conduit seems to be NMC (grey insulation) so that it is safe for now.

Is there any way to fix/repair it without re-wiring?

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you, Ral238!

Unfortunately, this was not noticed during the home inspection and wires enter the finished part of the basement (i.e. behind the wall) and there is no easy way to pull the wire out.

Would you recommend sealing it with epoxy or similar for now? The wire inside seems to be UF or similar.
 

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Thank you, Ral238!

Unfortunately, this was not noticed during the home inspection and wires enter the finished part of the basement (i.e. behind the wall) and there is no easy way to pull the wire out.

Would you recommend sealing it with epoxy or similar for now? The wire inside seems to be UF or similar.
Dig it up a few feet and cut wire. Sleeve new LB on and use a UF splice kit underground.

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Did the inspector find anything else wrong?
That broken box, that twisted spigot and the ground wire attached to it are signs of some sloppy or hurried work.
Hopefully the rest of the house was done with a little more care.
 

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In spite of the fact that it should be replaced, it can be repaired (at least, temporarily - to make it watertight) by using an appropriate "Epoxy Putty" - largely, on the inside.
(Here is just one example of such a product - Loctite All Purpose 2 oz. Epoxy Putty-1999131 - The Home Depot )

This product "mixes" like modeling clay.
Clean the "crack" and the inside of the box, mix the product, apply it to the "crack" and the inside of the box, squeeze the parts together, remove most of the excess on the outside and hold the parts in position with "Duct" tape (or similar.)
Smooth out the excess on the inside of the box - with a depth of about 1 to 2 mm for about 5 mm on either side of the "crack"
(This will act like a "plaster cast", a "damp finger" can do the "smoothing" - and you have only 5 minutes from mixing the product to complete the process)!

Retain the "excess" until it is "as hard as a rock" - at least 30 minutes - then, remove the "Duct" tape.

You should find that the box has been "repaired", if the product has adhered to the inside - as it should if the surfaces have been cleaned properly.
 

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I have done so called temporary/ permanent repairs on these as well. If you can pull the fitting together and using some sealing type epoxy, one or 2 hose clamps you can do a pretty good job. I've had one job inspected and passed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Thank you for all the feedback!

> Missouri Bound: Did the inspector find anything else wrong?
Yes, a lot of 'stupid' things that are easy to fix ... unfortunately he missed a lot of things I would consider as important.

>FrodoOne: squeeze the parts together

I think this will not work as the crack is most probably related to the shift of the underground conduit. I was rather thinking about using a larger conduit body 'on top' of the existing one sealed with epoxy putty.

The good thing is that the cable inside seems to be UF-type cable and it remains electrically safe.
 

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Thank you for all the feedback!

"squeeze the parts together"

I think this will not work as the crack is most probably related to the shift of the underground conduit.
You wont know until you try it!
If the parts can be "squeezed together", epoxy putty within the crack and a significant layer of this acting as a "Plaster Cast" on the inside is likely to "hold" and make the "box" stronger than it was originally - since manufacturers tend to use the least amount of material that they can "get-away" with.

I have repaired the Die-cast box cover for an automobile windscreen wiper (and many plastic cases) using such a product and all have "lasted".
 

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and wires enter the finished part of the basement (i.e. behind the wall) and there is no easy way to pull the wire out.
Well, I work 99% in conduit. I look at that and my presumption is there's a continuous conduit pipe running to another location which is accessible.

My first question is "what breaker is this outdoor run on?" My second question is what else is on this same breaker? Are any of its junction boxes anywhere near this wall entry?

I would be popping off every junction box cover in the area looking for a gray cable coming into it via a conduit pipe.

Oh, and since the LB obviously broke from physical damage (e.g. getting whacked by a vehicle), maybe a metal LB is warranted.


If I were going to attempt a repair, I would use fiberglass layup with epoxy, and then, timely paint that. UV light degrades epoxy (and plastic).
 

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The OP suggested this was feeding an outdoor light. Prework will go a long way in being successful. Dig down a bit and take as much stress off the piping run as you can. When your confident you can pull the fitting together without having too much stress on the pipe clamp the pieces together with hose clamps.(first remove existing strap below LB). Attempt to resupport conduit securely in place, expoxy or seal together with apprpriate material, fasten on cover and gasket. This is all assuming that the job cant be repaired in a more secure fashion without major renovation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, I work 99% in conduit. I look at that and my presumption is there's a continuous conduit pipe running to another location which is accessible.


I would be popping off every junction box cover in the area looking for a gray cable coming into it via a conduit pipe.
There is no need to open every junction box as there is a switch inside the house that controls the outdoor post light on another (inside) wall with a visible 'regular' NM cable.

The actual connection to UF (gray cable) is made somewhere behind a finished wall in the basement, I assume next to the point where the cable enters my house - unfortunately, the wall is finished with wooden boards, i.e. opening wall will require a lot of work to cover it nicely.

For now, I will try to fix it with epoxy putty as suggested in the conversation thread!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
... Dig down a bit and take as much stress off the piping run as you can ... This is all assuming that the job cant be repaired in a more secure fashion without major renovation.
Thank you, this is exactly the way I would like to go!

My other idea was to look for a larger (probably 3/4) conduit body and cut it to use as a 'cover' for the cracked LB body
 

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I would do the same. Pull it together gently without snapping it off, seal it just as others mentioned.
Then, I would probably get a couple angle brackets, concrete screws, exterior window caulking along with a bit of plywood.
Make a small box and seal it and shoot some paint on it...
Sounds like you have many great ideas already as well.
Good luck with your repair of choice!
 

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See if I can post a picture here.

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I put this box up each fall just to keep my outside water tap from becoming rusty then need replacement.
I have no shut off for it inside the basement.
So, was hoping to prolong the life of the tap through the winter months.
Seems to be working well going on 10 or so years now.
 
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