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Discussion Starter #1
And it didn't turn out so great...

The first 2 pics are primed MDF interior trim. Nail holes were filled with timbermate and spot primed with Stix primer, sanded with 180 then 220. The last pic is a pre-primed door sanded with 220.

I'm using a graco x5 and a tritech 208 tip. The paint is BM Advance satin with no additives. I don't know what the exact pressure was, but the dial was turned about halfway between the start and max settings. Temperature was about 70f with ~60% RH.

The pics were taken with a flashlight shining parallel to the surface, so it accentuates the imperfections, but I still feel like the results should be. much better.
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Yeah, thats pretty terrible. I thin advance just a tad with distilled water to help it coalesce better with a thinner coat. ITs super hard to get it that exact window between running, and coalescing into a nice surface. IF you spray it to where its a nice solid coat, and it looks like it will be glass, it will sag. you have to spray it to where it looks like it needs more, but enought to where it will level off. 60% humidity is your ENEMY... I bought a dehumidifier, just for advance, cuz i have a terrible time finding that sweet spot, and the more humidity you have, the easier its gonna run, and when you have a room full of wet doors, that humidity shoots up really fast, and all of a sudden the doors that looked perfect ten minutes earlier, are all curtained with sags.

Its an extremely difficult product to spray vertically....
 

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I’m not a pro, just a diy’er but I do have experience spraying automotive paint.

I was drawn to BM Advance because of the rave reviews I read about the quality, but if it’s this finicky to spray, I might take a different route. At nearly $60/gal, mistakes aren’t cheap.
 

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Its an extremely difficult product to spray vertically....
You are getting me nervous Woodco. I have shelves and louvered doors (9 or them) to shoot and it's me first time. The doors will be vertical. I was sold that Advance was the product to use for it's superior glass like finish. The recoat times do not bother me, but sags sure will. I will be spraying them with my brand new GX19 and never sprayed interior trim. Was going to spray the closets first to get some practice and then graduate up to the doors and shelves with Advance. Not sure of the tip size for the trim. Suggestions? What BM product would you suggest for the trim given my inexperience?
 

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I think you're using the right tip. Thats exactly what I used the last time I sprayed it.

Cabinet coat is a bit easier. Scuff-x is a lot easier, but I wouldnt trust it on any shelves or anything horizontal. Then again, thats only because I sprayed some furniture of my own with black scuff-x and stuff still sticks to the horizontal. I think its because of the dark color, though. Other than that its bulletproof, and looks awesome.

Honestly, though, you dont NEED some special trim paint. You can spray Regal on there and it would look damn near as good, and still be pretty durable. It would look better overall simply because its easier to not screw up. Hell, I used to spray Ultra Spec on trim... Nothing wrong with it, its just not as durable, and doesnt quite look like oil, but I dont think advance looks like oil either, because its so thin. Scuff-X looks like oil to me, and it goes on just like a normal latex.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think you're using the right tip. Thats exactly what I used the last time I sprayed it.

Cabinet coat is a bit easier. Scuff-x is a lot easier, but I wouldnt trust it on any shelves or anything horizontal. Then again, thats only because I sprayed some furniture of my own with black scuff-x and stuff still sticks to the horizontal. I think its because of the dark color, though. Other than that its bulletproof, and looks awesome.

Honestly, though, you dont NEED some special trim paint. You can spray Regal on there and it would look damn near as good, and still be pretty durable. It would look better overall simply because its easier to not screw up. Hell, I used to spray Ultra Spec on trim... Nothing wrong with it, its just not as durable, and doesnt quite look like oil, but I dont think advance looks like oil either, because its so thin. Scuff-X looks like oil to me, and it goes on just like a normal latex.
yea, I’m honestly just after a really nice looking finish that’s easy to spray. I don’t have kids or pets and don’t plan on playing bumper cars inside so I don’t need the paint to be like a rock. The trim I’m using is flat 1x6 and 1x4, so the ability for it to be sprayed smoothly is more important that durability for me.
 

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I would just go with regal, or better yet, scuff-X if theres no shelves. and up your tip to a 211 for casing and a 411 for doors. You're gonna need to get that stuff back smooth though, then you might need to reprime. Even advance will not look like glass, unless the surface is already that smooth to begin with. A normal latex like Regal or scuff-x has quite a bit more build, but I always spray a primer on just to have more build that I can sand smoother.
 

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Which roller do you use for painting? I prefer to paint the finish from a spray gun if you need a perfectly flat surface.
 

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We are talking about spraying here, but if I were to roll trim, I like a Flocked foam roller, but they are hard to find. a 3/16" mohair or microfiber mini roller also works well. I would only use a roller on doors or sides of cabinets though. For Jambs and base, brush strokes look better, and disappear with advance and a touch of extender, so I actually roll the paint on the trim, for speeds sake, then lay it off with a good brush in one motion.
 
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