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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello this is my first attempt at crown molding. i am a super newbie. i have no tools for the job and i am in the process of getting them. here is what i have on my to buy list so far. i am looking to buy these tools this weekend and start the project next week,

here the air compressor ia am looking at. i have someone selling one for $40 down the street from my house but havnt pulled the trigger yet because i have no idea what i am doing.. :eek:

http://www.harborfreight.com/air-to...psi-oilless-pancake-air-compressor-95275.html

heres the finishing gun i am looking at
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs...talogId=10053&productId=100670928&R=100670928

and my ceiling is 9'-0 so im planning on using 6" molding. i am stuck on the mitre saw portion because i dont know what i need so any suggestion on that or anything else i would apreciate it. i know my items are pretty much bare minimum which is ok because i will not have any bigger projects than this. for now. i want to spend around $100-125 if possibble for a saw and could go up on the gun like $10 if it makes sense.

so once again suggestion, concerns. thanks
 

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Not enough space here for a detailed explanation. There are good books on trim carpentry at book and home stores. Look up crown molding procedures, and learn about coping for inside angles.

That 18 ga nailer is a bit light for what you propose. Keep in mind you have to go thru the molding, the wall finish(drywall or plaster) and into wood framing. 16 ga or even 15 ga is better. Consider the Paslode nailers, not hose or cord to drag around.

You will need a good miter saw, preferably a compound miter. For that size molding, it almost has to be a 12" saw.
 

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I'd get a nailer with a 2 1/2" capacity.
 

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Welcome to the forum, good to have you with us.

The tools you have mentioned are very light weight and of low quality. Just starting most people will start with a less expensive tool and there is nothing wrong with that. One thing to know about less expensive tools is you will be spending a lot of your time trying to get them to work, as many of the less expensive guns will start to hang and jam after a while. You might do better buying a used higher quality tool for just a few $ more.

Just Bill is right about the gun being the wrong size for most molding, it just won't hold the right size and length nails.

IMHO 6" ceiling mold is too large for a 9 foot ceiling, it might make your room look top heavy with the walls no taller than that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome to the forum, good to have you with us.

The tools you have mentioned are very light weight and of low quality. Just starting most people will start with a less expensive tool and there is nothing wrong with that. One thing to know about less expensive tools is you will be spending a lot of your time trying to get them to work, as many of the less expensive guns will start to hang and jam after a while. You might do better buying a used higher quality tool for just a few $ more.

Just Bill is right about the gun being the wrong size for most molding, it just won't hold the right size and length nails.

IMHO 6" ceiling mold is too large for a 9 foot ceiling, it might make your room look top heavy with the walls no taller than that.



Thanks for the input, i will be looking for another gun after I type this, about the size of the molding what would you suggest. i will try to see if i can get some scrape of different sizes so i may see for myself as well. i checked a chart online for the molding size and it suggested 2 1/2" -7 1/2" for 9'-0 ceiling


as far as installing i have been reading online and looking at videos for about a month now and i am ready to dive in. my next concern was the tools now..
 

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6" too large. I agree.
 

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Crown Moulding at least to me is very Agrrevating to do and get right. I keep a few scrap pieces with the correct cut.

When I go to make a new cut I use the scraps to make sure I have the crown and the blade oriented correctly.

I often thought about buying a jig to help, but I am getting better and think I can survive without

http://www.kregtool.com/CrownPro-Prodview.html

But it is still tempting
 

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I choose the crown size by the size of the room, not the height of the ceiling. The crown size should be balanced by a proportional base treatment.
 

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If you don't intend to do other projects forget the air compressor and gun and buy a hammer and some nails, that approach has worked well for decades.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
i bought a 6" piece from homedepot and it is way to big i think i will go with 4"

the Kregtool looks tempting and might be of use, but i had the same idea of cutting samples and keeping them aside so i can pretty much copy them when im cutting.

as far as the hammer i think ill pass lol i plan on maybe selling the tools once im done. i thought about renting them but for what they cost to rent i might as well buy them. this is my second dyi project and maybe i will keep them just in case, went looking at mitre saws today ay homedepot, not a team member in sight so im still confused on those. quick question the back stop or plate the you hold the wood against can you buy height adjustments for those i notice the cheaper ones lke a 10" ryobi mitre saw but the back plai only goes up like 3" and i will need a much bigger one for 4 or 5 inch molding

ok really dumb question which side is up and which side is down on the molding lol sorry..
 

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The side with the most decorative junk on it is usually the bottom. If that doesn't help, look for the thickest side; that would be your bottom.

Or......... you get smart, and ask your wife how SHE wants it.
 
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i bought a 6" piece from homedepot and it is way to big i think i will go with 4"

the Kregtool looks tempting and might be of use, but i had the same idea of cutting samples and keeping them aside so i can pretty much copy them when im cutting.

as far as the hammer i think ill pass lol i plan on maybe selling the tools once im done. i thought about renting them but for what they cost to rent i might as well buy them. this is my second dyi project and maybe i will keep them just in case, went looking at mitre saws today ay homedepot, not a team member in sight so im still confused on those. quick question the back stop or plate the you hold the wood against can you buy height adjustments for those i notice the cheaper ones lke a 10" ryobi mitre saw but the back plai only goes up like 3" and i will need a much bigger one for 4 or 5 inch molding

ok really dumb question which side is up and which side is down on the molding lol sorry..
This is why you either buy or build a jig.
 

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I cut larger crown moldings laying flat on the table. You won't cut larger moldings with a 10" saw standing it up. 3 1/2" is about the limit with a 10" saw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
hello guys i just wanted to update you on a few things. well i finally got my equipmnet. i ended up geting a 16Ga nail gun 2 1/2" like suggested. i bought a 12 in tradesman saw with stand on craigslist for $125 seem like a good deal lol and i got a craftsman pancake compressor 150PSI max
my crown molding will arrive in about 2 hrs and i am going to give this thing a shot. i practiced some coping last night on my sample piece that i had and it looks way easier in the videos that i have seen then to actually do it myself lol. not sure if i need to cut it a cetrtain way if i am coping or is it the normal 45 cut and thats it? it only for inside corners i know but does it matter what piece i cope? and also if i cope, do i need to 45 the other inside corner pieces or can i leave it at a 90 and install flush with the wall. i hope im making sense here..
 

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Installing crown molding and coping are a learned skill that will take time. Videos will just give you the gist of the task. To fully understand it, you need to do it, again and again.
You will need to set the room up first. You shouldn't measure, cut and nail.
Crowns have different angles. Some are 45 degrees, some are 38 degrees.
Both surfaces need to lay flat on both the wall and the ceiling. To make sure, cut a scrap piece off(12" or less) and go around the room.
Start in a corner, lay the molding up there and make a mark on the top and bottom of the molding on the wall. Do this at each corner and a few places in the middle.
After you cut the molding, bring it to the lines and nail it in place. When you hit the lines, you know the molding is situated correctly on the wall.
Test cope a scrap piece for the second wall. Line it up on the marks and see if it fits tightly to the first piece. If it doesn't, adjust the cut angle and re cope it. When the fit is acceptable cut it at that angle. The other side will be cut at 90 degrees.
Work your way around the room.
The last piece will be coped on both sides. Cut a test piece for both sides before you commit to cutting the actual molding.
You'll probably find the corners have different angles. They might vary 2-4 degrees. Test cuts will get you closer to a snug fit then cutting them all the same angle and caulking the gaps.
If you're staining, it's important the cuts are precise or it will look like crap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Installing crown molding and coping are a learned skill that will take time. Videos will just give you the gist of the task. To fully understand it, you need to do it, again and again.
You will need to set the room up first. You shouldn't measure, cut and nail.
Crowns have different angles. Some are 45 degrees, some are 38 degrees.
Both surfaces need to lay flat on both the wall and the ceiling. To make sure, cut a scrap piece off(12" or less) and go around the room.
Start in a corner, lay the molding up there and make a mark on the top and bottom of the molding on the wall. Do this at each corner and a few places in the middle.
After you cut the molding, bring it to the lines and nail it in place. When you hit the lines, you know the molding is situated correctly on the wall.
Test cope a scrap piece for the second wall. Line it up on the marks and see if it fits tightly to the first piece. If it doesn't, adjust the cut angle and re cope it. When the fit is acceptable cut it at that angle. The other side will be cut at 90 degrees.
Work your way around the room.
The last piece will be coped on both sides. Cut a test piece for both sides before you commit to cutting the actual molding.
You'll probably find the corners have different angles. They might vary 2-4 degrees. Test cuts will get you closer to a snug fit then cutting them all the same angle and caulking the gaps.
If you're staining, it's important the cuts are precise or it will look like crap.

thank a lot very help full i will try this approach. no staining i will just be painting white. anything i should do before installing that will help painting. in some videos i have seen people have tape underneath the molding before it is installed.
 

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You can paint the molding before you install it. Do touch ups to the nail hole filler and any caulking after it's up.
Walls and ceilings will have dips. Where the molding spans the gaps, you'll caulk later. Tape can help if your painting skills are...suspect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You can paint the molding before you install it. Do touch ups to the nail hole filler and any caulking after it's up.
Walls and ceilings will have dips. Where the molding spans the gaps, you'll caulk later. Tape can help if your painting skills are...suspect.
thanks again. another one for you. do you use the caulking to fill the holes as well or use wood filler??
 

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Some may disagree with me here but I always install the coping saw blade backwards from the way it is when new because I like to cut on the push, not on the pull. The reason is, there is less chance of chipping the face of the trim if I am cutting on the push instead of the pull. If you don't cope the cut clean you can always clean it up with a good sharp pocket knife.

Another trick I always did on my coping saw was to stretch it to make the blade tighter, for some reason the saws just were never tight enough, a tight blade will not flex like a slack one will which will lessen the chance of breakage.

When I installed the ceiling molding and I had a long piece that ran from wall to wall, I would leave the two pieces square on the right and left walls and miter and cope both ends of the piece that went from wall to wall. I always cut the piece a little longer than what my measurement was from wall to wall. The reason was, I could bed one end in place and nail it, bow the mold out in the middle and bed the other end and nail that end. I would push the middle in and finish nailing the rest of the piece. Cutting the piece a little long will force it to bed tighter and lessen any gap in the joints.

If I had to splice a piece, I always cut both pieces on a 22 1/2° as it holds in place better than cutting the splice on a 45°.

Filling the nail holes I used spackling compound as it was easier to sand out smooth.
 
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