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Discussion Starter #1
guys, I have my drywall up - it's my first ceiling. It's a bathroom ceiling. When I've done walls, I know to tape/float the seams and mud the screw holes etc., then a couple of coats of primer, and paint. I thought it'd be the same for a ceiling, but read somewhere you have to skim coat with joint compound the entire ceiling. Is this right?!
 

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not needed and only an experienced guy should do that. Skim coat looks great when done right but when its done wrong, . . .

Keep it simple. do a good job and paint it in a low luster finish and you'll be happy for years.
 

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Drywall contractor
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No necessary or done often unless it's a very high end home or gloss paint is going to be used. Stick with flat paint and you'll should be fine....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
just out of interest, how does the shine on the paint make a difference? If the paint is going on over a couple of coats of primer, how does it know what's below that?

It being a bathroom, I'd typically hope to use a somewhere from an eggshell to a semi-gloss - that a problem do you think?
 

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Drywall contractor
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Gloss paint highlights any imperfection on the wall or ceiling. "The nature of the beast" so to speak, I guess because of more light reflecting across the surface. Your joints once sanded are actually smoother than the face paper on the drywall. (Run your hand over your wall and you can feel the difference.) That inconsistency will be enhanced by gloss paint. The joints also absorb paint at a different rate than the paper (much faster) which can cause the joint to "flash". The shinier the paint the worse the problem. A good drywall primer will take care of much of it, but the "glaze" coat does the best job. If you want to try it, you basically just apply a coat of thinned mud with a broad (10" -12") knife and wipe it back off, say a 5 or 6 sq.ft. area at a time. You don't need to try to build up the mud like covering a piece of tape. Just wipe on - wipe off. lightly sand the entire surface and you're good to go. On large areas one person can roll the mud (thinned way down) and another wipe down with a knife......
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks - that makes sense. I've a small room, ceiling is maybe 6 feet by less then 4 feet - so i'm tempted to give it a shot!
 

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Drywall contractor
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A small area shouldn't give you a problem. Best of luck.
 

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I'd do the walls too....
 
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