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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My basement was formerly finished, and now it is not. In the process of gutting it, a lot of 2x4's were pried up off the floor. And the nails would leave holes in the floor. maybe 1" or so round, and maybe 1/2" deep. Little upside down volcano type holes. I'm looking for a way to fill/smooth them over before the paint goes down. There are a TON of them so I don't want to just ignore them.

The first thing everyone's going to say is, just use floor leveling cement. I have been using that on a lot of the low areas, and a lot of the messy areas where they dug up the cement to put in pipes. But I can't skim coat my entire basement in that stuff! And its not well suited for slowly filling in small holes. I've tried and it separates too fast. If you pour it normally, you end up with the stuff disappearing into tiny cracks until theres very little left on the surface. It has it's uses (I'm still using 150 lbs of it in that basement) but I need something else.

So I asked a contractor about something I could use that would be almost like spackle, something I could apply with a putty knife or similar tools, and smooth out over every hole. Slowly. As there are many holes. The answer I got from this guy was "high strength concrete with no aggregate in it, it might be called grout". He wasn't very helpful. I did find one bag but he said that wasn't it. I asked someone at Lowes and they suggested the bucked of concrete patcher. It seems like that might work better, but the Lowes guy also didn't exactly seem like an "expert" on the topic.

What do you guys think? The bag, the bucket, or something else entirely? Once I'm done, I'm painting over the floor, so I'd like it to be as smooth as possible, but I don't really care about coloring as I'll never see it.



 

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Ayuh,.... I'd probably use bagged hyd. no shrink grout, mixed to a paste consistency,....

Not the hyd. grout stuff in a bucket, it sets up Way too fast, in My experience,...
It's more of a mix, 'n pour to tighten up, 'n seal the cracks yer loosin' the levelin' compound in,...
 

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Another vote for Hydro patch or the 1 Qt, Epoxy fill bottles. Sounds like the plates were Powder nailed, if they left holes like that when pried up.
 

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You look like you have already visited the Cement products aisle at your local big box store.

All of the info you need is in the replies.
 

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go back to the apron/vest store & buy rapid set cement in the yellow plastic bucket,,, iirc, aren't you the 1 wants to paint his conc floor ? if you've already got that mind-set, you're not after low-maintenance or anything close to permanence,,, be a good idea to be certain the nail divots are clean & damp before patching them

all the replies have given you enough information to find what you need - directions are on the container
 

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Grab a bag of Portland cement, a couple bags of bar sand, and some bonding agent.
Dry mix the Portland and sand at a 1 to 3 ratio. This way you can take just as much as you need at a time.
Clean out the holes
"Paint" the holes with the bonding agent
Mix of the Portland/sand mixture with the bonding agent.
Fill and finish.
 

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or do what the brickie sez,,, you'll have more of a mess & it'll take longer but you likely spend more, too

we do this for a living so can't waste time on brickie's fol-de-rol method,,, it does work but it costs more & takes much longer,,, even carrying 94#bag of portland out of apron/vest store's a pita compared to a small 10# plastic bucket which comes with a handle at no addl $$$$$
 

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Before I epoxied my basement floor I had craters where re-wire came up straight out of the mix and had been broken off in several places. I used something in a box called Pourstone from HD to fill them. It's intended to be used to seat bolts and anchors in concrete. It's a nice smooth mix. After it set overnight I used emery paper (120?) stapled around a scrap of 2x4 to get it perfectly smooth.
 

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or do what the brickie sez,,, you'll have more of a mess & it'll take longer but you likely spend more, too

we do this for a living so can't waste time on brickie's fol-de-rol method,,, it does work but it costs more & takes much longer,,, even carrying 94#bag of portland out of apron/vest store's a pita compared to a small 10# plastic bucket which comes with a handle at no addl $$$$$

If he has a "ton" of these to do it will not cost more. The method I described will give a more than suitable repair.

Masonry is my business. This is what I'd sell to a customer and not have to worry about any failures. If that is "fol-de-rol" so be it.
 

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brick, i agree it'll work + work well,,, based on the op's idea of painting the floor after filling divots, i chose 10# bucket - more than enough to do what he's got

repairing conc's our main biz incl historical brick restoration, etc, down here but worked out of woodbridge into the city before coming down
 
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