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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, doing a few projects around the house and had a few random questions come up:

Is it a code violation to run romex in conduit? I thought I remember a friend saying you could only run THHN or XHHW in conduit. I have to make a few homeruns from electrical panel in my basement up to the attic (ranch house - only 1 floor in between) and I'm considering putting a couple lengths of conduit in the wall (gable wall, non-load bearing) to create a channel for future electrical projects.

Is it a code violation to use regular white schedule 40 pvc for electrical conduit instead of the gray schedule 40 electrical conduit with a female end?

And is there any issues with running coax cable for an HD antenna on the roof in the same conduit as electrical cable? I think I remember reading that that causes disturbances in the data running thru the coax.

Thanks in advance,
JC
 

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Knows Enough to be Danger
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"Code" really depends on where you live. I imagine you'd have a better chance if you supplied that.

I don't know about coax per se, but most people in the AV world say you should separate video cable from AC. Usually by a foot or more. And try to run parallel, crossing only at perpendicular, and no more often that absolutely necessary. I'd commend running conduit for your AV cables if you can get to it. Only makes your life easier in the future.
 

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JOATMON
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The white PVC is not rated for electrical.

One of your issues is people see it and will think it's water. They might cut into it trying to install a Tee. It's kinda like the color of lines in the street. You know not to cross a yellow, but white is ok.

AFAIC, you 'can' put nm inside conduit, but some local codes and inspectors don't like it. One of your issues is derating.

My question would be....why do you want conduit? Just run the NM (romex) as is....just make sure you nail it to studs where you have access. If it's existing construction, it can hang inside a wall cavity without being nailed.

If you really want conduit, then use stranded wire. A whole lot easier to pull.
 

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Generally, yes. If considered exposed work you can run NM, NMC, and NMS rated wiring in electrical non-metallic conduit. It's not worth it to cheap out and buy "conduit" which is meant for plumbing (that part of the project isn't going to break the budget).

Articles 334.15(B) and 378.22 provide guidance, but are not all-inclusive on the subject. Article 334 addresses non-metallic sheathed cable ("romex", which is a brand name). You can review all relevant NEC code sections here. Create an account and you can view all NFPA codes for free.

I wouldn't run the coax with the conductors. You could, at a minimum, use quad shielded coax. Even then, depending on what is being powered by the branches, the coax is sharing a raceway with, you may end up with interference (hum bars, video static, noise). There are many considerations to take into account, and I don't know for what you plan on using the coax.

If you do run electrical and coaxial together, make your best effort to ensure an equipotential bond is maintained between the electrical system and whatever networks/devices are connected to the coax (i.e., home entertainment, telephone, computers, etc.) it would go a long way to prevent issues from the outset and down the road. By following standard NEC practices, this will happen naturally.

A qualified electrician should know all of this off-hand. If you explain what you want with the end in mind, they would likely complete whatever work you wanted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all of your replies.

My question would be....why do you want conduit? Just run the NM (romex) as is....just make sure you nail it to studs where you have access. If it's existing construction, it can hang inside a wall cavity without being nailed.

If you really want conduit, then use stranded wire. A whole lot easier to pull.
The reason I'm considering conduit is merely future-proofing. I figured if I installed conduit from the attic to the basement, it would make future additions a whole lot easier. Instead of having to fish cable thru insulation ("former" exterior wall - addition built off gable end of the house) multiple times, I thought it might make more sense to run a couple 1" or 1-1/2" conduit lengths to create a channel for future additions.

I wouldn't run the coax with the conductors. You could, at a minimum, use quad shielded coax. Even then, depending on what is being powered by the branches, the coax is sharing a raceway with, you may end up with interference (hum bars, video static, noise). There are many considerations to take into account, and I don't know for what you plan on using the coax.
I'm installing an HD antenna on the roof that has to go to the basement where the 8-way cable splitter/amplifier is. I'm now considering just running a length of 2-circuit NM-cable at the same time and just leave it there for future additions. I'm using quad-shield coax. So you're saying I could definitely have issues in the future with TV signal were I to wire the NM-cable to a device? What are my other options? I really don't want to run in 2 separate bays, as I have to cut a whole in the dining room to pull the wire thru, I'd rather cut only 1 whole instead of 2.
Thanks again.
 

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You won't definitely have issues, but it increases the odds if they are run in the same conduit without control over spacing over certain distances. It would be dependent on any number of things like running loads like fans (type-dependent), vacuum cleaners, dimmer circuits, LED lighting (type-dependent), fluorescent lighting (type dependent), heaters, etc. If you are just using the branch for lighting or other electronic devices then you likely won't have an issue.

Given just a few examples above you can see how it might be easier to just not have to take any of that into consideration and just keep them separate.

I don't know what dB levels you will be dealing with on your satellite network, but I know that if I went into an 8-way with my Xfinity cable TV, I would have issues with signal strength. I have a four-way and it almost makes the menus unusable on the distant runs (about 50 feet). The signal-to-noise ratio that you are left with is where the noise might creep in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
... Given just a few examples above you can see how it might be easier to just not have to take any of that into consideration and just keep them separate.
Think I'm going to ditch the conduit idea and run a 2-circuit cable into the attic and just leave it there for future projects. Do you think I'd be safe running the coax on one side of the bay and the romex on the other side like Oso suggested? There's also insulation in the wall, don't know if that'll help prevent any issues.

I don't know what dB levels you will be dealing with on your satellite network, but I know that if I went into an 8-way with my Xfinity cable TV, I would have issues with signal strength. I have a four-way and it almost makes the menus unusable on the distant runs (about 50 feet). The signal-to-noise ratio that you are left with is where the noise might creep in.
Currently I have xfinity cable that goes into a 2 way splitter, then into an cable amplifier, then into a 5 way splitter. I used to have issues before the amplifier was installed but haven't had any since. My plan is to keep xfinity for Internet, so the cable company's line coming in from the street I'm going to connect to the cable going to the modem. Then I'm going to run the antenna cable straight to the amplifier , and replace the 2 separate splitters with an 8way just to keep it organized. Ill only be splitting it 5 times. hoping the amplifier will work fine with the antenna signal.
Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I don't know what dB levels you will be dealing with on your satellite network, but I know that if I went into an 8-way with my Xfinity cable TV, I would have issues with signal strength. I have a four-way and it almost makes the menus unusable on the distant runs (about 50 feet).
I highly recommend that you install a cable amplifier (like this one: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000F28DP2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_GvlrxbTZNF4KQ )
Right before your cable splits 4 ways. I can almost guarantee your menu issue will go away once this is installed. I installed this same exact amp at a friends house last week and they haven't had any problems since. Super easy to install if you have a coax splitter and crimper, and a nearby electrical receptacle.
JC
 
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