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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m not an electrician and hoping to get good professional electrician advice here, if any are on this forum, please.

I’m Finishing Basement. Doing new rough and electric and will ask a rough in inspection soon. Ontario Canada.

Q1) Light switch - end of the circuit (panel to few outlets to light to switch) - avoiding the older way’ of having a ´Hot White 14-2’ out of switch to light (with black markings) ...
Which of these 2 options is best and up to codes:
a) 1 x 14-3 between light and switch (black bring hot to switch, red brings hot back to the light / the white of the 14-3 in the switch is not used and wire nut terminated.
b) 2 x 14-2 between switch and light (black on switch and white spliced wife but together beside the switch in the switch box

Q2) One circuit 15A with 6 outlets (6 boxes of 1 outlet each) - all Pigtailed. Question re the ground wires. Incoming 14-2 ground is first screwed to box (all around screw clockwise). Same for outgoing cable to next outlet. Then I pigtail a third 6” ground to both. The tail will ground the outlet (plug).
- Should the pigtail of the 3 grounds be wire nut too like all white and black pig tail should (1 splice wire nut with 3 wire grounds (14-2) to best respect and pass codes in Ontario ... or a good long tight twists on ground is also accepted?
In theory a wire nut splice should offer a better junction but I don’t know what inspectors wants to see to respect code on that one.

Q3) distance from front walk to cable staples on side of rough in. Some inside wall in 2x3 - 14-2 cables stapled right in the middle - that offer a bare 1.25” from top of rough to the wires. I’m for sure putting metal plates on both side of all studs on this ones.
- Is codes distance from top of drywall or from top of rough ? And is it 1.25” or 1.5”?

Thank you so kindly for your time and all your answers.

Kindly
Jack
 

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Q1) Light switch - end of the circuit (panel to few outlets to light to switch) - avoiding the older way’ of having a ´Hot White 14-2’ out of switch to light (with black markings) ...
Which of these 2 options is best and up to codes:
a) 1 x 14-3 between light and switch (black bring hot to switch, red brings hot back to the light / the white of the 14-3 in the switch is not used and wire nut terminated.
b) 2 x 14-2 between switch and light (black on switch and white spliced wife but together beside the switch in the switch box
You can't just double up 2 cables to make 1 cable with enough wires.

The only way 2 x 14-2 would work is if you use one cable to bring power to the switch box, then the other cable to bring switched-power + neutral back to the lamp. That means you'd have 2 completely separate groups of neutrals in the lamp rose that must not be connected to each other! If feasible run 14/3 instead and settle it.

Q2) One circuit 15A with 6 outlets (6 boxes of 1 outlet each) - all Pigtailed. Question re the ground wires. Incoming 14-2 ground is first screwed to box (all around screw clockwise). Same for outgoing cable to next outlet. Then I pigtail a third 6” ground to both. The tail will ground the outlet (plug).
If I were wire-nutting grounds and used one of those "thru-hole" wirenuts, I would want the spur to be the one coming from the metal box - easier to replace. I'm not a fan of thru-hole honestly.

Keep in mind, if the box is metal, then the mounting screws which mount the switch also provide a grounding path for the switch. So if you ground the metal box, you don't need to run a ground wire to the switch.
 

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I may need to be corrected.

I believe in Canada that your ground wires require a wire nut.

Also, in Canada, the switch or receptacle requires a ground wire even if it is connected to a grounded metal box.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That means you'd have 2 completely separate groups of neutrals in the lamp rose that must not be connected to each other!
Thanks for your answer. Yes indeed that option would have 2 sets of white ... i represent it in this picture shemas attached ... I also prefer the 1 x 14-3 cable but Id like to know if this option of 2 cables (2 set of white in light box) is or not passing ontario code?
 

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Thanks for your answer. Yes indeed that option would have 2 sets of white ... i represent it in this picture shemas attached ... I also prefer the 1 x 14-3 cable but Id like to know if this option of 2 cables (2 set of white in light box) is or not passing ontario code?
Well it looks right technically (Code notwithstanding). To be clear the reason for this rigmarole isn't just Code; it's physics. Weird things happen when currents are not equal in any given cable. This wiring satisfies that real-world requirement.

But Canada is an odd place, they don't even do train wrecks properly!
 

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Each light switch must have a neutral, single-pole, 3-way, 4-way (does not matter), so you have to wire accordingly. The device, switch or receptacle must be bonded if there is an attachment point for a bond wire.

Bond wires do not need to be nutted together. Once they are attached to the box, they are mechanically and electrically connected.

Wires in receptacles do not need to be pig-tailed unless on a MWBC.

Rule 12-516 requires the cable be at least 1.25" (32mm) from the edges of the stud / joist, etc.

Cheers
John
 

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Q1-14/3 would be the better option. The more preferred method would be to have the lights on there own circuit, not code but the way I prefer to do it.

Q2-Look at your ground screw and see if it has a little tab next to it. Most ground screws I have seen in device boxes have these tabs. With the tab you don't have to wrap the wire all around the screw, lay it between the tab and under the screw and tighten the screw. No need for pigtails for the ground. When you bring your grounds in and wrap around the screw leave one long enough to reach the receptacle. The other one can be cut flesh at the ground screw and the metal box will bond them. Makes for a neater box and less bare copper laying around.
 
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