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Hello, I live in Florida where the soil is soft and we get strong winds from storms. I am replacing my fence and trying to decide whether I need to put cement in or no cement or use crushed stone instead in posts. I know there is a lot of debate about this. I had a few post break at the ground level and those were cemented in and lasted about 13 years.

Does it help to put cement and above the ground level and sloping away? Would digging a 3 foot hole and using crushed stone instead of cement be good? It will be a board on board 6 foot tall fence
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Burn wood posts from the dirt surface to a foot below the surface until they are charred and you'll like how long they last , and possibly the next owner of that home too .

 

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Burn wood posts from the dirt surface to a foot below the surface until they are charred
Thank you for this reminder.
Short version... Christmas tree farm busted off 2 almost new 6x6 posts used for a tree baler. Yep..tree was huge and they used a tractor. I was talking w/the foreman who wanted to use concrete. I'll mention the charring.

Have fun...Don.
 

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I have both wood fences and metal fences on multiple properties.

The wood fence posts over time rots at the soil/post interface lines.

The metal (steel) posts corrode and disintegrate over time.

Now where I am in south Florida we have a lot of rain and sun, and occasional floods and I live near water so some of the flood water can be partially salty which I think causes the metal posts to corrode faster.

For wood posts I make the concrete around it higher and sloping down.

For metal posts, I am still slowly replacing them one at a time. In some cases I fixed them by cutting off the rotted section near ground, then drove a round metal pipe whose OD is just a tad smaller than the existing post's inside dimension and pounded it in as deep as it can between 18" to 24", then use structural epoxy or weld in a mending piece where the cut away section is. Then I pour a higher concrete base completely encasing the bad section inside a sonotube. I then put three coats of liquid epoxy over the post and concrete before painting over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
My chain link fence has been in the ground for probably 40 years but it is galvanized. I’d like a combination of both. Durability of steel and look of wood. Put pipe in ground 2 feet and drill hole in post and slide it over pipe, this way the wood doesn’t touch the ground. I live in Florida with storms but seems like a ,12 thick pipe would hold

I am able to get .40 CA treated wood in case I do put the wood in the ground
 

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As I said earlier you can dip or apply with a paint brush any number of insect repellents/fungus killer and I would think that would entend the life of a 4x4 PT post
Here are some treatments
Boracare
Timbor
Cooper coat
Asphalt/Tar
Asphalt Fence Paint
Used oil/Diesel
Your choice I believe it add life to the wood
Just my 2 cents
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
I am going with the 4x4 posts but purchased #1 grade, thought maybe the few dollars more would provide a better post. The post were just delivered to the lumber yard so they are very, very wet. I am not installing for another week but today was the only day I could get them. Should I store in my garage or outside? It is supposed to rain some this week. Will they warp if I install them while still wet?
 

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Store them outside the hot florida sun shud dry them out as long as there is no rain predicted if not inside
I store PT wood outside under a tarp and it stays dry
I would use some kind of insectide/ fungicide on the part going under ground to make them last longer
I mentioned insecticide / fungicide in
an earlier post
It make them pretty much bullet proof for about 20-30 years
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Store them outside the hot florida sun shud dry them out as long as there is no rain predicted if not inside
I store PT wood outside under a tarp and it stays dry
I would use some kind of insectide/ fungicide on the part going under ground to make them last longer
I mentioned insecticide / fungicide in
an earlier post
It make them pretty much bullet proof for about 20-30 years
I did purchase some woodlife copper coat
 
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