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You probably want to go with 4x6 posts.
Two feet in the ground + 10-12" diameter hole + concrete, by FL code.

One of my friends has such a fence, full paneling ( made with 2x6 and 1x lumber for slats ), it withstood hurricane force winds fine.
 

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Are concrete fines the same as crushed stone? Would concrete fines be a good material to set a post in?
Drill your hole, 4-6" deeper than required.
In the bottom add what we call river rock, (+/-) golf ball size. This will keep your post off the dirt, drainage of sorts.
Insert post. Tamp rock a bit.
Plumb the post, use stakes and 2x to keep it straight and plumb.
Backfill w/the the excavated dirt, tamp every 3-5" or so.
Once installed, remove braces.
Repeat as needed.
Wait a day or 2 for the posts to settle.
Could use a hose, add water to further compact dirt. Add dirt if/as needed.

HTH...Don.
 

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Hello, I live in Florida where the soil is soft and we get strong winds from storms. I am replacing my fence and trying to decide whether I need to put cement in or no cement or use crushed stone instead in posts. I know there is a lot of debate about this. I had a few post break at the ground level and those were cemented in and lasted about 13 years.

Does it help to put cement and above the ground level and sloping away? Would digging a 3 foot hole and using crushed stone instead of cement be good? It will be a board on board 6 foot tall fence
Hello, I live in Florida where the soil is soft and we get strong winds from storms. I am replacing my fence and trying to decide whether I need to put cement in or no cement or use crushed stone instead in posts. I know there is a lot of debate about this. I had a few post break at the ground level and those were cemented in and lasted about 13 years.

Does it help to put cement and above the ground level and sloping away? Would digging a 3 foot hole and using crushed stone instead of cement be good? It will be a board on board 6 foot tall fence
I had a fence once with posts set in cement. When it rotted off at the ground my neighbor came to help. He said "I want to show you something". We dug up the concrete and the post was fully encased in the concrete and rotted off at ground level. This is because rain ran down the post for years, soaking into the post and settled in the concrete encasing. We hit it with a sledgehammer and broke it open. The whole post was totally saturated, waterlogged ith water. Since then what I do is put down a paver first, brick, or something for a footing. I prefer a paver...or pour in a little pea gravel. Then mount the post on top of that and get it vertical and surround it to ground level pouring in pea gravel. The post will not budge. And rain will soak through into the ground and just not sit there for years. Works for me.
 

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What about all the dirt on 4 sides of the post for 2 feet vertical?
notnew2diy, the dirt on either side is just a vertical wall of dirt. There is about 3-4 inches of pea gravel surrounding the post and filled up to ground level. I don't think it ever falls in between the pea gravel if thats what you mean. But, I've never dug it up to look , to be honest. I do know this: once that pea gravel was poured in that post was very firm in the hole. The gravels touching each other provide a very sturdy brace. If you mean will it wash in between the gravels....I don't think so. If it did I doubt it would be enough to rot out the post. I suppose larger gravel could be used too, but my thinking is that would be more susceptible to dirt washing in but over a long time. Another thing I need to point out: The paver (or gravel) at the bottom (before inserting the post) is for the post to rest on and not touch the ground and provides for rain to soak on in to the ground and not just sit there like it does when totally encased in concrete.
 

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What about all the dirt on 4 sides of the post for 2 feet vertical?
I don't worry about it. The dirt will not, per se', retain water. It will drain down, like rainwater in a field. The post sits on rock/gravel/a brick/a cookie to prevent the bottom of the post from somewhat retaining water.

FWIW...I took this pic yesterday. WRC 4x4x8' post I used in my wifes animal barn. 2 female donkeys used it as a fire hydrant for over 15 years, planted as described above, 36" deep. It has sat outside for the past 5 waiting to be reused. Yes... there is some rot but not what you would expect. I pulled it out w/the front end loader on my tractor.




HTH...Don.
 

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I’m in St Augustine Florida—
After the hurricanes we had Irma and Nicole my fence was barely up it had real problems after trying Sampson Fence Menders to fix it and I tried filling with gravel but it never got solid enough I gave up on both options they didn’t work in this case
I dug holes near the old posts cut old posts down to the ground and put some used 4x4 posts I got from a fence company free about 6 of them
Dug 2 foot deep with a clamp shovel (hole digger clam-style) and filled with a 60 lb bag of concrete and set the posts level
Made sure the concrete covered the post under ground and came up on the post with concrete about 4 inches from the ground and slanted it down accordingly
I analyzed the wood rot and concrete for a while now
you cant help it eventually the posts will rot out
Beside metal theres not much you can do and metal sometimes rusts in concrete
But the fence I was repairing was over 30 yrs old its board or board
Finally the fence after getting beat up from the hurricanes recently
some the posts were broken at the dirt level
But I figured it lasted a longtime so I think with the used posts it will last a longtime
Since I was off measure with posts I joined the 2x4 rails together with short 2x4s and where the board on board is I fastened the fence together with the slants so I will think its pretty strong
I dont what kind of wood was used but my guess is its cypress or cedar—proably cypress! Cause it lasts and lasts
On the new used posts I used 1/4 inch all thread about 8 inch in length and went through the post with nuts and washers and then ground them off to the desired length
Now the fence is straight again looking down it
PS I did hit water when I dug the posts in just filled it with dry concrete and mixed it in the hole and used a little wet concrete to put it higher on the post and slanted it down
Also put nails in the posts below grade just for something for the concrete to adhere to
I may as go back and fill it with dirt to make it higher on the inside fence line
and kinda match the posts as as the height
 

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I enjoy a living fence which is to use commercial grade galvanized chain link with metal posts made from salvaged drill pipe. Then I plant honeysuckle plants or other evergreen plants such as holly for looks and privacy.
Chain link might be a very good choice in hurricane country.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
What are the thoughts on the post protector sleeves that are sold? These are the hard plastic ones that you set the post in and not the post saver that melts on. Seems like you can drill some holes in the bottom or just cut the bottom out so that any water that gets in will just drain at the bottom
 

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You could treat the pressure treated 4x4 posts with Cooper Coat or Timbor or used motor oil/diesel fuel
That works good for non pressure treated wood it stops insects and fungus
Or use asphalt paint from tractor supply
Tin Material property Paint Font Drink
 
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