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Discussion Starter #1
So, here I am trying to wire up my shop. The plan is to swap the main feed from the house, to the shop and have the meter for the property on the shop and then run the feed through the panel (via the feed through) back to the house panel (Feed for the property is ten feet from the new shop and much closer than it is to the house).

My concern is that the new panel is 200 amps (with a feed through), the existing house panel is 200 amps. I'm only going to be needing about 100 amps for the shop. Mainly just a welder on a 50 amp breaker, some lights and a few outlets. I can't find any info on what the feed through rating is for the panel. I'm assuming it's not greater than 200 amps as that's what the main breaker in the new panel is rated at.

So if the new panel is rated at 200 and I need a feed off the panel of 200 amps for the house would that max it out and not allow me any amps for the shop?

This is the panel.

Siemens
Model # MC0816B1200RJBT


Hope I made that clear and intelligible.

Thanks!
 

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Why would you go through all of that problem. Not worth all of that work and effort to move the main from the house to the workshop. Also if there was a fire at the house, the firefighters would never know that the main is at the shop.

Depending on the distance between the house and the shop. If not that far, just run a line for a subpanel. If far, then maybe have the utility split off before the house for the house and shop. Your utility would give you best way to do this.
 

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I'd advise a load calc on the service to make sure a 200 amp conductor can carry the calculated load. If it is enough, putting a 200 amp panel for the house doesn't mean you can't have breakers at the shop too.
How'd you come up with 100 amps for the shop? Welders usually don't draw anywhere near the breaker size nor are the conductors required to be sized the typical way a conductor is sized to a breaker.
 

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I agree with Gregzoll. Far more realistic to sub-feed the garage through a 100 amp breaker. I just did a similar job using THHN and URD. Around here, the utility gets wary when a property owner wants too much utility involvement. The Al URD wasn't too pricey, but Cu THHN is very pricey.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
While, in an ideal situation and in past ones I've fed the garage via the house. The power is ran a little odd on this property where the main feed is across the road, comes across and halfway down the rear of the property then feeds into the rear of the house. The shop is between the house and the pole where the feed comes in. Having talked with the power company they thought the best way would be to add a 10' feed from the pole to the shop, then just swing the house feed over to the shop. The cable I'm using is 4/0 aluminum. Ideally an underground feed would be best, but the septic runs through the area where it'd have to be dug. It's an older property and the layout isn't ideal. If I had a spare 30k to redo where the well, septic and power fed into the property I would. But you work with what you have.
 
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