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As I was out in the cold this morning, finishing the job of changing the spark plugs in my truck, I was reminded again how much I love my indexable head ratchet. It lets you reach those bolts in those awkward corners and speeds up spinning bolts in and out once they're broken loose.

I also discovered how helpful an extension with an extendable magnet in the end can be in some situations, like pulling and installing spark plugs in those deep sleeves where they're hidden in most modern engines. Also great for keeping bolts in the socket while removing and installing them into hard-to-reach or impossible-to-reach spots.

There are some tight spots on cars where a thumbwheel drive is pretty handy, too.

What are some of your favorite lesser known tools?
 

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Decades ago, front disk brake pad R&R, the allen wrench, couldn't get enough umph to break them loose. My FIL laughed, came back w/a piece of black pipe, 1" diameter, maybe 12" long. Gave me enough leverage, room to hit it w/a hammer. I've still got that piece of pipe in my tool box.

RIP Harold...Don.
 

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I am going to run down to the local HF and pick one of these up.

As I was out in the cold this morning, finishing the job of changing the spark plugs in my truck, I was reminded again how much I love my indexable head ratchet. It lets you reach those bolts in those awkward corners and speeds up spinning bolts in and out once they're broken loose.
 

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I have several of these... different material and length cheater pipes. Indispensable.

Decades ago, front disk brake pad R&R, the allen wrench, couldn't get enough umph to break them loose. My FIL laughed, came back w/a piece of black pipe, 1" diameter, maybe 12" long. Gave me enough leverage, room to hit it w/a hammer. I've still got that piece of pipe in my tool box.

RIP Harold...Don.
 

· Big Dog
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I do not know if it qualifies as "lesser known tools", but I still have many of my tools from when I worked Telco pre-2000.
Among them are;

Harris-dracom-TS21-lineman-test-phone-butt-set-picture.jpg Harris-Dracon TS21 Butt Set (I actually have 2 of these)

100B Tone test set.jpg Progressive Electronics 100B Tone Test Set

200B Induction Pickup.jpg Progressive Electronics Induction Pick-up (used in conjunction with the 100B_)

They all still work. I use the tone test set and induction pickup to trace LAN and electrical wiring (with main electrical power off of course)
The tone test set has a "battery" feature. When set to this, and attached to the wires you can have a butt set attached at each end of that wire and carry on a conversation. We have done this with wires up to 2 or 3 miles long.

Font Machine Composite material Metal Auto part
Panduit GS2B Tension Cable Zip Tie Installation Gun Tool. It is used for controlled tightening and cutting flush zip ties which prevents overtightening. Overtightening LAN cables can crush them causing problems with network performance.
 

· Naildriver
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I found this to be invaluable. I hate tearing up the right pocket on jeans with a tape measure clip. Just throwing the tape in a pocket takes up pocket space in your belt. Having this attached to your side all you have to do is get it close and the magnet will do the rest. Never falls out.

Product Yellow Gadget Font Material property
 

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Left-handed drill bits. Yeah, sounds like something you send the new guy off to the tool crib for. But haven't you ever tried to drill out a bolt and had the drill just drive it in deeper? Not with the left-handed bits!

The zip tie gun is pretty handy, too. Those two things in the OP are new to me. Something else to add to the list!
 

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Happened to me 1 time in my life. Should have played the lottery that day.
Lol, yes....everyones lucky day.

But that reminds me, this tool has been on my bucket list for some time. (Induction bolt heater) I work on outboards a lot but they have mostly stainless bolts. I was wondering if you could put a socket on the stainless bolts head and then heat that up. Not sure the heat would transfer through enough.

 

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I've never had one turn after I snapped it off, which is the only time I've ever had to drill one.
I had one once many years ago changing a water pump, apparently the bolt was over stretched, and the head snapped off.
After the pump was removed I grabbed what was left with vise grips and it turned and I got it out.
Only time that ever happend though.
 

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I do alot of doors and trim.

Starrett miter saw protractor and a digital angle finder (protractor style, not the magnetic ones) to set the blade on my saw.

For doors, I use the Ryobi lockset jig and their hinge jig with the Harbor Freight trim router. A set of self centering hinge bits.

Titanium hammer.

A 5 in 1 painters tool.

BalusterPro app. I use it to calculate Wainscot/paneling spacing.

This prybar set gets used a ton. The smallest one stays in my pouch. Ive used them as prybars, scrapers, chisels in a pinch, as shims, etc.

 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for sharing, jeekinz. I have one of the lockset jigs, too, but I forgot to mention it because it's been quite a while since I've used it. I've never tried a hinge mortising jig, probably because I've never done more than a couple doors at a time, and I've had enough practice doing it with a hammer and chisel, it probably would take me just as long to set it up and do it with the jig.

Off topic, but that reminds me of a tip I'll share while I'm thinking of it. For razor sharp chisels, finish the edge by running them across a sheet of 160 or 200 grit sandpaper on a hard, flat surface.
 

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For rounded hinge mortises you can start with (IIRC) a 5/8 forstner bit. Cut the radiuses and the center. Then its only 30 seconds with a chisel.

Ive done that way chuisel sharpening on a site before. I use stones in my shop, but sometimes you need to do that.
 

· Big Dog
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SUIZAN Japanese Pull Saw

Takes a bit of practice but once you get the hang of it, it makes excellent cuts both cross and rip.

I recently had to cut some 1x10 boards. I thought about getting out the miter saw but went with the pull saw. I cut the pieces I needed in less time than it would have taken me to get out the miter saw, set it up and do the cuts.

Rectangle Wood Table Tool Font
 
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