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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My bathroom faucet is leaking from under the seat. I have tried wrapping the seat with Teflon tape, but it didn't really help.

Would it work to caulk the threads of the seat before I put it in? Assuming everything is sufficiently dry.

Any other suggestions? I really don't want to replace the pipe.
 

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Could be:
- Damaged thread. Was the seat ever replaced? How old if the faucet?
- Seat doesn't sit right. The seat must be the right seat for the faucet.
- Seat is not tight enough.
- The stem or the washer on the stem mismatched or worn out.
Sometimes you have to do things you don't want to do to solve the problem, this could be one of those times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The building was built around 1965, so the faucet is probably about that old. I replaced the seat last year. It was leaking from under the seat, but wrapping it with Teflon worked then.

I also have a shower that is leaking from under the seat. It was built in 1956. I concluded that it was leaking from under the seat because I replaced the seat and the valve, and the leak didn't stop. (I've replaced the seat several times over the years.)

The people I talked to said that the water has probably worn a path through the pipe/threads, so the water is getting in that way. Which leads me to the original question. Using caulk to seal the threads seems like a logical move, but none of the plumbers I have talked to suggested it. Did they just not think of it, or is there something that I'm not seeing? (likely the case)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So... there comes a time when the useful life of a thing comes to an end.
Pick out whichever new Delta or Moen suits and install it.
It's not that simple.

This is not a faucet that sits on top of the porcelain. The valve goes horizontally into a pipe that is embedded inside the porcelain. The porcelain is attached to the wall. How does one go about removing the pipe from inside the porcelain?
 
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