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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a bilevel, concrete slab, 2 sets of steps with an intersecting landing, the upper set of steps, the underside is sheetrock in a closet, to access the underside of the lower set of step, you go in the same closet on the lower level, on the slab, then through a trap door in to under the landing looking to the left the underside of the steps. These steps are bare wood, the steps facing the inside of the house is cold. I want to insulate these steps. I was either going to use rock wool, or fiberglass enclosed inside a plastic sleeve. I was not sure the best way to fasten it to the bottom of the steps. Cutting the insulation to fit width wise then using staples however there will be cold spots. I have not been under there for several years so I don't know if the following would work, cutting 1/4"-1/2" thick strips from the 1 1 /2" edge of a 2x4 using my nail gun to fasten, maybe 16 or 18 gauge. I also have lots of 5/8" or 3/4" plywood I could cut strips from, maybe 2" wide? Nailing these wood strips across the deep part of the steps. This way I could run the insulation the length of the steps, about 6 steps, butting each width of insulation to each other across the steps.

Or I could go out and buy foam insulation using contact cement to glue it to the underside of each of the steps and riser.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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If you compress any batting, you are defeating it's usefulness.

Fiberglass, and other loose fill, rely on the air pockets within, to aid in keeping the cold on the outside.

The foam and contact cement is doable, but get a can of GREAT STUFF to add to the perimeter and corners, to fill any gaps with.



ED
 

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Hammered Thumb
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I wouldn't insulate the stair at all, unless you are going to do it to the entirety of landing, its support walls, and access door (and even then I wouldn't follow the steps, but furr out a ceiling plane following the angle of the stringers), but then you have cold storage. I would just insulate the exterior wall under the landing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you compress any batting, you are defeating it's usefulness.

Fiberglass, and other loose fill, rely on the air pockets within, to aid in keeping the cold on the outside.

The foam and contact cement is doable, but get a can of GREAT STUFF to add to the perimeter and corners, to fill any gaps with.

ED
Agree, I'm trying not to compress the batting. Limited height under there, 4' maybe, sitting on my ass on concrete.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I wouldn't insulate the stair at all, unless you are going to do it to the entirety of landing, its support walls, and access door (and even then I wouldn't follow the steps, but furr out a ceiling plane following the angle of the stringers), but then you have cold storage. I would just insulate the exterior wall under the landing.
Let me give you more information.

It's on a concrete slab, ground level of the house, half the space is under the lower steps and landing abutting to the closet on one side and the other side is abutting to a closet in a downstairs bedroom, both are insulated walls, sheetrock on the interior and exposed studs and insulation in the under the steps space. The other half of the space is under the outside concrete porch and front steps so 3 walls of that half of the space are bare concrete. The uninsulated are those 3 concrete walls, the underside of the steps, and the bottom, underside, if the entrance landing when you walk in the front door. I want to insulate the steps and landing. The landing I'll probably do with foam board with screws and washers or strips of wood.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Agree, I'm trying not to compress the batting. Limited height under there, 4' maybe, sitting on my ass on concrete.
Do not do that for long.

You will develop "roids". :vs_OMG:

Cold concrete is bad for one's health.

Could you just build an insulated wall, to close this hole off, but still leave it accessible with a door of some kind.


ED
 
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