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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I need to have the crown repaired on what I think is called a exterior flue enclosure for a wood fireplace. I believe the construction was wood frame with cement board and brick face. I am sure brick face was used. The problem is the crown is asphalt shingle which is worn at the corners that overhand each vertical wall overhang of the enclosure. One possible problem I see on the original installation is this asphalt shingle crown was not pitched from the flue to the outside. How should the repair be done on the crown? Should it be pitched?
 

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I need to have the crown repaired on what I think is called a exterior flue enclosure for a wood fireplace. I believe the construction was wood frame with cement board and brick face. I am sure brick face was used. The problem is the crown is asphalt shingle which is worn at the corners that overhand each vertical wall overhang of the enclosure. One possible problem I see on the original installation is this asphalt shingle crown was not pitched from the flue to the outside. How should the repair be done on the crown? Should it be pitched?

It's called a "chase", the top is called the "chimney cap" AKA a "chimney chase cover" when it's topping a chase rather than a solid masonry chimney. (There's often also another cap on the chimney, the cover over the flue is called a "rain cap").

The best solution as a custom made galvanized, copper or ss metal cap, this can be made locally or ordered on the net, for example:






- http://chasecovers.com/

One thing to keep in mind is that this this is a manufactured wood burning fireplace the vent (flue) pipe and terminator are required to be listed for use with the rest of the manufactured fireplaces system. This means that while you can use an unlisted chimney cap you have to obtain all the listed parts of the system from the manufacturer or some other source of properly listed components.

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Home Inspection: "A business with illogically high liability, slim profit margins and limited economies of scale. An incredibly diverse, multi-disciplined consulting service, delivered under difficult in-field circumstances, before a hostile audience in an impossibly short time frame, requiring the production of an extraordinarily detailed technical report, almost instantly, without benefit of research facilities or resources." - Alan Carson

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. The fireplace was built about 18 years ago. I would assume that then, and of course now, asphalt shingles are not an acceptable method to cover the chase. I am assuming the contractor used a UL flue pipe, the fireplace unit is a Superior brand. What part are you referring to as the terminator, the rain cap?
 

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I would assume that then, and of course now, asphalt shingles are not an acceptable method to cover the chase.
Shingling a chase top not prohibited (i.e. I can't reported as a "defect" at either the fireplace system or the roof system during a home inspection). But I think you can see the downsides of doing it this way at your current chase - shingles are not listed for low slope applications such as the top of a chase cover, so you need to put down a layer of waterproof shingle underlayment (which is your actual water barrier) and even if you do this you also have to install a metal drip edge because the shingle edges will erode, which then becomes a path of water entry into the chase.

A lot of the cost of the replacement is just the time to get someone out there, get them up the ladder and get the work done, so when someone is going to be occupying property for a few years and there are already problems IMO it makes sense to install a properly pitched chase cover made of well-galvanized or stainless steel cover with the correct drip edge - once that's been done the only maintenance required is to get up there every few years to inspect the sealant bead between the vent pipe and the chase cover.

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Superior is now a subsidiary of Lennox, which prefers that end-users go through a reseller for parts and service, you can locate one here:

http://www.lennoxhearthproducts.com/locate/?reqType=2

they will be ale to determine what parts are required/available.

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The terminology gets a little complicated as it's not standardized, but for your application:

a) "Terminator cap" (Heatilator) AKA "Rain cap" (Superior/Lenox): The top section of the vent pipe assembly.

b) "Chase top" AKA "Chase cover" AKA "Chase cap": The cover on the top of the chase through which the vent pipe assembly passes.
case"

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Home Inspection: "A business with illogically high liability, slim profit margins and limited economies of scale. An incredibly diverse, multi-disciplined consulting service, delivered under difficult in-field circumstances, before a hostile audience in an impossibly short time frame, requiring the production of an extraordinarily detailed technical report, almost instantly, without benefit of research facilities or resources." - Alan Carson
 

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A lot of the cost of the NY Escort replacement is just the time to get someone out there, get them up the ladder and NY Escorts get the work done, so when someone is going to be occupying property for a few NY Asian Escorts years and there are already problems IMO it makes sense to install a properly NY Asian Escort pitched chase cover made of well-galvanized or stainless steel cover with the correct drip edge - once that's been done the only maintenance required is to get up there every few years to inspect the sealant bead between the vent pipe and the chase cover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Shingling a chase top not prohibited (i.e. I can't reported as a "defect" at either the fireplace system or the roof system during a home inspection). But I think you can see the downsides of doing it this way at your current chase - shingles are not listed for low slope applications such as the top of a chase cover, so you need to put down a layer of waterproof shingle underlayment (which is your actual water barrier) and even if you do this you also have to install a metal drip edge because the shingle edges will erode, which then becomes a path of water entry into the chase.

A lot of the cost of the replacement is just the time to get someone out there, get them up the ladder and get the work done, so when someone is going to be occupying property for a few years and there are already problems IMO it makes sense to install a properly pitched chase cover made of well-galvanized or stainless steel cover with the correct drip edge - once that's been done the only maintenance required is to get up there every few years to inspect the sealant bead between the vent pipe and the chase cover.

---------------

Superior is now a subsidiary of Lennox, which prefers that end-users go through a reseller for parts and service, you can locate one here:

http://www.lennoxhearthproducts.com/locate/?reqType=2

they will be ale to determine what parts are required/available.

-----------------

The terminology gets a little complicated as it's not standardized, but for your application:

a) "Terminator cap" (Heatilator) AKA "Rain cap" (Superior/Lenox): The top section of the vent pipe assembly.

b) "Chase top" AKA "Chase cover" AKA "Chase cap": The cover on the top of the chase through which the vent pipe assembly passes.
case"

-------------
Home Inspection: "A business with illogically high liability, slim profit margins and limited economies of scale. An incredibly diverse, multi-disciplined consulting service, delivered under difficult in-field circumstances, before a hostile audience in an impossibly short time frame, requiring the production of an extraordinarily detailed technical report, almost instantly, without benefit of research facilities or resources." - Alan Carson

Thanks for the info. It looks the existing drip edge was installed upside down. The flared end is pointing up instead of down. Is this correct? If I go with the stainless chase cover should this existing drip edge be used (installed correctly of course) and the cover mounted over it. The drip edge looks to be made of aluminum siding over a wood frame.

I had a an estimated the repair using a rubber membrane (used on flat roofs) over a fiber glass mat. I realize a stainless cover is superior as you mentioned above, but is this an acceptable repair?
 

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Exterior Flue Enclosure Repair - Chimney Chase Cover

Thanks for the info. It looks the existing drip edge was installed upside down. The flared end is pointing up instead of down. Is this correct? If I go with the stainless chase cover should this existing drip edge be used (installed correctly of course) and the cover mounted over it. The drip edge looks to be made of aluminum siding over a wood frame.

I had a an estimated the repair using a rubber membrane (used on flat roofs) over a fiber glass mat. I realize a stainless cover is superior as you mentioned above, but is this an acceptable repair?
A properly fabricated stainless chase cover will incorporate a vertical skirt with an additional drip edge, similar to the chase cover pictures that Michael posted above. In fact, I happen to be the proud owner of those pictures! (Thanks Michael for posting them and for your expert analysis.) The chase covers you see in the pictures are a one-piece design, which will eliminate the possibility of water intrusion. To answer your question, a stainless steel chase cover is an acceptable repair, and in fact is a one-time solution that is guaranteed not to rust.

Sorry for the shameless plug, but you are welcome to give us a call if we can help answer any other questions you may have. You can reach us through our website http://www.chasetoppers.com. The advice is free, as always, and we are pleased to offer non-obligatory price estimates to fit your situation. Hope this info helps!

-Tom
 
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