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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
My first plan was to buy 6 feet of copper wire, splice the wire, attach the 4 wires to the stove, use duct tape to keep the wires secure there, run the cord behind the counter using duct tape to secure it in place, and then on the other end of the copper wire, splice again get my 4 wires and insert them directly into the receptacle, again using duct tape to secure it all... wrap the entire cord in duct tape several times, around and around and around just to make sure it all sticks together and stick the cord to the wall with the attached duct tape. Then proceed to wrap the whole cord again in electrical tape.

This avoids ANY junction boxes. and provides a direct connection to stove to the wires in the wall. what more could go wrong? :wink:
 

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I've seen worse. But that would have been a fire waiting to happen. With the amount of current your stove pulls thru those bad connections that you made, even your trusty duct tape wouldn't help contain the heat.
 

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My first plan was to buy 6 feet of copper wire, splice the wire, attach the 4 wires to the stove, use duct tape to keep the wires secure there, run the cord behind the counter using duct tape to secure it in place, and then on the other end of the copper wire, splice again get my 4 wires and insert them directly into the receptacle, again using duct tape to secure it all... wrap the entire cord in duct tape several times, around and around and around just to make sure it all sticks together and stick the cord to the wall with the attached duct tape. Then proceed to wrap the whole cord again in electrical tape.

This avoids ANY junction boxes. and provides a direct connection to stove to the wires in the wall. what more could go wrong? :wink:
I am little lost here but what did you make a spice between the copper and alum conductors ???

And in fact any transations of cable materals like from copper to alum or viceverisa you must have a juction box and that is no connires on this one.

And why you want to wrap the whole cord in electrical tape ?? that is inviting of overheated cord or cable.

Merci.
Marc
 

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PS. no one has commented on the way I am creating the link between the copper and the aluminum within the junction box. Am I missing anything other things ... other than the cap, the goop to rub into the aluminum and put into the cap twist it, wrap it in lots of electrical tape? Ive done copper to copper before but never copper to aluminum, im assuming its the same, other than you need the special goop (forget the name) and the special cap. correct?
Nope can't make the connection that way. There are special wire nuts that are purple but I wouldn't use them for extending a range cable. Range cables operate at very warm temps at times this is an aluminum connections worst enemy. You probably want something you can get at the local big box so go get a compression connector like the image.
These are alumniconn connectors for joining al to cu.
 

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Stubbie.,

I think the OP will need the Polairs connectors they are much bigger than what you show on the photo.{ of course some big box store should have them if not the electrical supply centre will have it }

Merci.
Marc
 

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Yeah your right marc


I was just looking and they don't make them to accept over #10 awg. thats what I get for trying to find something outside the electrical supply network. He could use it for his equipment ground connections.
 

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Of course but the OP still need junction box anyway

To OP here the photo what we are talking about.,,



And I will never use the big bleu wirenut for copper/alum connection like that.

Merci.
Marc
 

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Sleepy says he has a jb big enough for the wires sizes.He will probably have to order the polaris online or electrical house. May not like the cost. He needs 3 at least.


What else would big box carry? Maybe shrink tube and compression connector?
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I am little lost here but what did you make a spice between the copper and alum conductors ???

And in fact any transations of cable materals like from copper to alum or viceverisa you must have a juction box and that is no connires on this one.

And why you want to wrap the whole cord in electrical tape ?? that is inviting of overheated cord or cable.

Merci.
Marc
Im joking dudes... sorry im very sarcastic, im not that dumb... yes I dont know all the ins and outs about electrical but i know enough not to use duct tape LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Of course but the OP still need junction box anyway

To OP here the photo what we are talking about.,,



And I will never use the big bleu wirenut for copper/alum connection like that.

Merci.
Marc
Oh man now you guys are talking about things Ive never even heard of... wont that Aluminum goop paste cool things down a bit? thats what I heard anyway? OR will it still run to hot? you really think itll burn up inside the junction box?
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
So I checked out what I could do in the basement to physically move the whole ordeal to the new location....

Seems to me my only option is to cut the cable running to the existing outlet... rendering it useless...The cables in the walls so thats where it will remain..stuck forever.

Run a new cable from the switch panel to the new location.... theres no other way around it. It just sucks knowing I have to go 5 feet and its going to take a few hours and a **** load more cable just to get it to where I need it to go. Oh well.... I wish I could somehow pull the cable back a bit and use the existing cable already tied into the breaker panel but it doesnt even move a millimeter. The closest I can cut is in the basement, about 2 feet away from where it would actually need to be installed on the other side of the wall in the kitchen. So id still have to extend it 2 feet...which means junction box... which means I shouldnt bother and I should just run a new cable.

Has anyone tried what im trying to do successfully before? Or do all signs point to run a new cable?
 

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Hmm forgive me if these have already been brought up but....

1. Is the cord/plug connected to the stove with screws or other?
1a. If it is just with screws why not just unscrew the existing cord/plug and install one of the same gauge wire but longer?

2. Why not just use the existing receptacle location as a junction box.... install a new receptacle box at the spot you want...... bring in the SAME size/type of wire from the new box to the old.... connect the new/old wire together.... add a metal faceplate on the old junction box and keep it accessible?


The alumnimuim goo you're refering to is for lugs and wouldn't be applicable in this situation. I would NOT NOT NOT mix copper/aluminum when dealing with this type of load. You're playing around with alot of current and that will heat/cool down the conductors alot... then loosen them... then fire... then insurance agent says your policy is junk because of improper wiring methods :whistling2:
 

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Seems to me my only option is to cut the cable running to the existing outlet... rendering it useless...The cables in the walls so thats where it will remain..stuck forever.
Sometimes that's the breaks unless you want to cut drywall but if the cable was secured/fastened as it should have been that may not be successful anyway. Also if it is ran thru bored holes tying to pull it back may damage the cable.

Run a new cable from the switch panel to the new location.... theres no other way around it. It just sucks knowing I have to go 5 feet and its going to take a few hours and a **** load more cable just to get it to where I need it to go. Oh well.... I wish I could somehow pull the cable back a bit and use the existing cable already tied into the breaker panel but it doesnt even move a millimeter. The closest I can cut is in the basement, about 2 feet away from where it would actually need to be installed on the other side of the wall in the kitchen. So id still have to extend it 2 feet...which means junction box... which means I shouldnt bother and I should just run a new cable.
This is by far the best idea you have had.....:thumbsup: Some 6/3 G NM-B won't set you back that much. Besides it will be an adventure don't look at it as work.

Has anyone tried what im trying to do successfully before? Or do all signs point to run a new cable?
Sometimes however I absolutely hate splicing a existing aluminum range branch circuit to extend it. If there is any way to run a new copper cable that IMO is the only option. If you can get the existing cable rerouted that would be good to....but doesn't look like that is going to work.

Sometimes it is also possible to install a small 2 space subpanel and use the existing branch circuit as a feeder to that sub-panel then install a breaker in that subpanel and run a cable from it to the range. About the only advantage to this that the splice is much better/easier using an enclosure with lugs and the subpanel location chosen may be a more convenient/safe disconnect than the cord and plug.
 
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