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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Extended W10x39 acceptable?

Just working on a large renovation... And I was just packing this beam and I noticed a piece was welded to this to extend the length? I’m not sure if that’s common practice and how that works for strength. As you can see in the picture it looks like they added 3 ½ inches .. 4 inches will be sitting up on the foundation wall. Funny thing is he mentioned it was cut too short and had to order another one but it looks like they just added to it. You can’t even notice on the top because they grinded it clean .. it was only when I was down on the floor packing it. I can’t imagine they would ship it out if it wasn’t just as strong however, you’d think he would at least mention it. He is a large structural metal supplier in our area and was aware of its use.


So do I have 314” of scrap metal in the basement or is this ok? I have emailed my engineer, but he can take days sometimes to get back to me. Just curious on other opinions.


The span is 306" as mentioned the cut end is on the basement foundation wall and the other on a 4x4 HSS post. It is a flush beam 2x10 floor joists. The only load is the main floor (living room/kitchen) no second story and the roof is all new trusses bearing on the outside walls.






Thank you,
Ryan
:vs_mad:
 

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I don't have answers about the steel but occasionally we have beams specked a little long or joist at the limit . when we build the basement walls that wall or point load can be extended down as most times the floor is on top of the footing. So the wall is on the footing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Re: Extended W10x39acceptable?

My answer applies to any steel structural member with a butt-joint.

Ok thank you... I have seen this done before in a barn but it had two plates about 10 inches long of the webbing and welded with also bolts. So I wasn't sure this was adequate. When you say welded properly are you reffering to full penetration welds? Or just the skill of the welder? I don't have any experience in welding however they do look good, and it was a certified welder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't have answers about the steel but occasionally we have beams specked a little long or joist at the limit . when we build the basement walls that wall or point load can be extended down as most times the floor is on top of the footing. So the wall is on the footing.

I was thinking of adding a post under it and have it inside the basement wall to satisfy my OCD, lol


Thanks,


R
 

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Re: Extended W10x39acceptable?

When you say welded properly are you reffering to full penetration welds? Or just the skill of the welder? I don't have any experience in welding however they do look good, and it was a certified welder.

"Complete penetration groove welds, [like the ones in a butt joint], have the same strength as the base metal and the connected parts can be treated as completely continuous at the joint." -Quote from Segui's Steel Design



By "properly" I meant done by a certified welder.
 

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Re: Extended W10x39acceptable?

By "properly" I meant done by a certified welder.
I'm not sure that being "certified" necessarily means that much. I've seen welders never certified that couldn't weld respectively at all. On the other side of the coin some of the best welders I've seen were not certified. Certification only means that you were able to pass the certification test, nothing more nothing less.
 

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Re: Extended W10x39acceptable?

I'm not sure that being "certified" necessarily means that much. I've seen welders never certified that couldn't weld respectively at all. On the other side of the coin some of the best welders I've seen were not certified. Certification only means that you were able to pass the certification test, nothing more nothing less.

"Quality control of welded connections is particularly difficult, because defects below the surface, or even minor flaws at the surface, will escape visual detection. Welders must be properly certified, and for critical work, special inspection techniques such as radiography or ultrasonic testing must be used." -Quote from Segui's Steel Design, Fifth Edition.

I do not recommend the poster to get his weld inspected if it was done by a certified welder under shop conditions.
 
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