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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone,

I am new to the concrete world but I like to learn and do things myself instead of paying someone to do it for me. I have attached a picture of my sidewalk before and after I've done some demolition. I would like to replace the aggregate with just concrete. I have broken about 1-2" of the slab and I would like to pour over the part I remove. I am removing the concrete with a demolition hammer.

Questions

1. Is this a good way to fix this problem (I need to keep the brick edge)
2. How deep do I need to remove before I pour new concrete.
3. Is quikrete crack-resistant the best product to use.
4. Am I missing anything? SHould I do something else?

I really appreciate the feedback.
 

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- Breaking a slab with a sledge hammer is fine, as long as you don't hit the bricks you're trying to save.
- A concrete sidewalk is usually 3-1/2" deep. A steel mesh is recommended for heavy traffic areas.
- Use concrete that meets your area standards. One fact about concrete: it cracks no matter what.
- Get yourself the necessary hand tools and start mixing. It doesn't look like you need to frame it, you will use the brick edge. Use the right amount of water. You mix well for at least 3 minutes. Do a complete section on the same day and don't stop till the section is done, included the finishing. I recommend doing this with a helper a helper.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks dj3

Follow up question: Is it possible to not remove the whole slab and just remove 1-1.5 inches and resurface? I have a demolition hammer that can do that work.
 

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Unfortunately, an inch and a half deep slab topper is just too thin (even for light use like a walkway) and will never bond with the bottom 2 inches.
You need one pour for best results.
 

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your sidewalk appears to have been 'seeded' w/finishing trowel using river pebbles probably not over 3/4" depth,,, easily removed by using a chipping gun & bushing hammer,,, then o'lay w/polymer-modified resurfacing cements,,, we do this work every day,,, wouldn't think you need a helper either,,, generally speaking, well placed conc never randomly cracks unless its been overloaded by either static OR dynamic weight loads
what bit have you used so far - brick chisel ?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Stadry,

Thanks for this option! I really dont want to bust out the slabs and repour. The pebbles come off real easy...its max about 1/2" thick. I have been using a Bosch 11316EVS for this work and have 3 chisels.

1" flat chisel
3" scaling chisel
R-Tec point Chisel

If i go the polymer-modified route how deep is too deep of removal?
What brand of polymer-modified is best?

I started on a section that had concrete damage (10" section was sinking) so I removed that slab and will pour a new one (today I hope). If I do the rest of the sidewalk in polymer-modified will there be a noticeable difference? Should I pour the slab but keep it 1/2" below the brick and then pour Polymer-modified on top?

Thanks you guys for the info. Im excited to get this project going.
 

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there's a qwik/sak resurfacing 'crete in the masonary section,,, we pres-sure wash, acid etch, neutralize w/ammonia 1:6 water, rinse 2x, & resurface,,, we do NOT use a 'bonding agent' as someone'll soon post,,, place your new replacement section & leave it only 1/16" below the anticipated top elevation of the adjoining conc,,, when all done, resurface both to same level,,, CUT a contraction joint when you top all over the old 1 otherwise the new topping will do it by itself & it won't be pretty
good luck !
 

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Discussion Starter #8
For the other sections do I just remove the pebbles? It will leave a 1/4 " to fill. Is that ok? Too deep?

I will head to the section you referenced and start researching.

Thanks again
 

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i did a topping layer over my sidewalk using the sand topping bagged mix. It ranges from 2" to 1" in thickness. The sidewalk underneath was solid, but fairly rough, and I saturated the existing concrete a day ahead (I got all the standing water off the surface before pouring the overlay), so I expect I got a fairly good bond. I kept it wet for a few days to help with the strength, also. 13 years later, it's holding up just fine. I've even driven a car across it once or twice.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Another question: Right now (if you look in the picture) the concrete sits right up on the edge of the brick. Is it necessary for be to use a edger when resurfacing? Can the Polymer-modified concrete be formed like concrete...meaning can I use an edger on it once it sets a little?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Most of my sidewalk is flat but there is a part that has a slope to it. Will this product run down slope? Can I control it more as it hardens?
 

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yes, you can BUT once it takes the initial 'set', leave it alone,,, you'll quickly get the 'hang' of it - its NOT 'runny',,, we cut back on the wtr & use it for vertical walls
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Can I ask what product you use? I've looked at Sakrete Flo-Coat and Quikrete RE-cap Concrete Resurfacer. On the Lowes website for each product there is a Q and A section that the manufactures have answered questions. Sakrete says their product will run on a slop and the final product would look bad. RE-Cap reviews says there is some issues with different colors.

Thoughts?

Also, here is the section I did over the weekend. It is more like 1/4 below the edge of the brick. I assume I have to wait 28 days like the manufacturer's suggest to add resurfacer?
 

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